Brooklyn parish undeterred by fire

first_imgBrooklyn parish undeterred by fire Three-day hurricane-relief summit commences Feb. 1 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Maurice King says: Press Release Service Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI February 1, 2013 at 8:09 pm Where God is, evil can never prosper. I give thanks for the unwavering strength and will of this faith community, where I once called home during my time in New York. By Sharon SheridanPosted Jan 31, 2013 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Washington, DC Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Albany, NY Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Comments are closed. Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Tampa, FL Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Submit a Press Release Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET [Episcopal News Service] It’s not quite a journey into the wilderness, but members of the Episcopal Church of St. Luke and St. Matthew in the Clinton Hill neighborhood of Brooklyn will be leaving their sanctuary during Lent as the church undergoes repairs following a fire two days before Christmas.Investigators determined the early-morning fire was arson, said the Rev. Michael Sniffen, rector. “The fire was set by somebody pouring gasoline across the entrances to the church and setting it on fire. They have not apprehended anyone, but the investigation is open and it’s being treated as a hate crime.”They do not believe the Dec. 23 fire was related to the church’s ministry as a major distribution hub for post-Hurricane Sandy relief services, he said. “The investigators didn’t have any reason to believe that it was about anything in particular.”Church Insurance has been working to determine the extent of the damage and the restoration required, getting estimates from experts in masonry, stained glass and other specialties, but does not yet have a total dollar estimate of the cost of the damage, Sniffen said. Scaffolding will be erected in February, and the congregation will move out of the sanctuary for about 12 weeks while repairs are made. They will worship in one of the church’s parish halls and hold fellowship in another.“We’re confident that it will be restored to like-new condition, but it’s going to be months of work even after the scaffolding comes down,” Sniffen said.The fire burned the main entrances and narthex and caused extensive smoke damage. The entire interior of the 1,700-person-capacity church must be repainted, he said. “That’s no small task.”None of the Operation Sandy hurricane-relief supplies were damaged, Sniffen said. “We had cleared all of the donations out of the church in order to get ready for Christmas Eve. We had hundreds of Christmas gifts for children, but those were all in the lower parish hall, so they were fine.”The church had been moving toward supporting longer-term recovery efforts, Sniffen said. Donated relief supplies now are located at Church of the Ascension in Greenpoint, Brooklyn, and a Coney Island warehouse. The relief kitchen has moved to St. John’s Episcopal Church in Fort Hamilton, Brooklyn. The Occupy Sandy communications team, initially slated to remain indefinitely at St. Luke and St. Matthew, moved to Ascension after the fire severely damaged the room it was using.Once repaired, St. Luke and St. Matthew intends to continue to host the communications team and train volunteers as well as become a host site for out-of-state work crews. It plans to renovate its bathrooms to add showers, and to renovate the kitchen. And because of the strong relationships that have been built through the relief work, the church also will host the People’s Network, dealing with local economic-justice, housing and food-justice issues, Sniffen said. “That will be a whole constellation of outreach programs rooted in our buildings that are supported by the faith community but are very broadly inclusive of everybody who shares our mission in the neighborhood.”On Feb. 1-3, the church will host The People’s Recovery Summit, bringing together people and resources to discuss post-Sandy disaster-relief issues ranging from mold remediation and health care to gutting and rebuilding houses and child care. The free summit will offer three meals a day and a concert each night.“People can show up for all or a portion of it,” Sniffen said. “We’re just excited for people who’ve been doing this work together to get together and to really identify what are the unmet needs and how can we work together to alleviate suffering.”The church has received strong community support since the fire. The morning of the fire, the congregation worshiped with the members of nearby Brown Memorial Baptist Church, which was celebrating Christmas on what was for the Episcopalians Advent IV. “It was sort of like Christmas came early,” Sniffen said.The congregation was allowed back into its sanctuary for Christmas Eve services, and people drove in “from all over the place” to help decorate, he said. “People showed up from farms in upstate New York with additional poinsettias. The church really looked beautiful. Our attendance was in the 300s.”His sermon, rewritten post-fire, is posted on the church website.“I think the mood of the congregation is really undeterred,” Sniffen said. The church burned down twice before, “and the church was rebuilt bigger each time, and the congregation grew in size each time.“So there’s really a sense that fire has had a role in renewal in this church’s past.”While congregants were upset by the fire, he said, “almost immediately people turned to an attitude of rebuilding.”“People had such a powerful experience of how integral a church can be to the life of a city and a community through all of our hurricane relief. So everybody was very focused on getting the church repaired so we could get back to what we do best: loving and serving our neighbors.”— Sharon Sheridan is an ENS correspondent. Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Curate Diocese of Nebraska center_img TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Bath, NC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Comments (1) Rector Collierville, TN The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Belleville, IL Submit a Job Listing This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Smithfield, NC An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Featured Jobs & Calls Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Submit an Event Listing AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Pittsburgh, PA Featured Events Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Shreveport, LA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, MElast_img read more

Helping to build a better future in Nicaragua

first_img Featured Events Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Bath, NC Helping to build a better future in Nicaragua Tags Rector Washington, DC Comments (1) Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis July 10, 2013 at 11:35 am that kind of project may be beneficial for both groups if it is a real learning experience;the report or the article has the same kind of terminology and observation that I find when the people from USA write about Haiti:”poorest country of the western hemisphere.. the floor with dirt etc “all kinds of stereotypes…but this is an enriching experience to have people from two different cultures to work together,people from two different value systems to make comment…the best thing is the fact they can live,eat,work and pray together.yvan Rector Knoxville, TN Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Director of Music Morristown, NJ Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Press Release Service Submit a Press Release Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ By Linnet TsePosted Jul 9, 2013 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Collierville, TN Youth Minister Lorton, VA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK center_img Comments are closed. Submit an Event Listing Associate Rector Columbus, GA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Pittsburgh, PA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Martinsville, VA Submit a Job Listing Rector Albany, NY Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Bubbles (“burbujas”) and balls were huge hits with the local children. [pictured: Carla Berry]. Photo: Linnet Tse[St. John’s Episcopal Church] For the eighth consecutive year, members of St. John’s Episcopal Church in Larchmont, New York, partnered with Bridges to Community, a non-profit community development organization based in Ossining, journeying to Nicaragua to undertake a building and cultural exchange trip at the end of June. This year, the group was joined by seven members of the First Presbyterian Church in Goshen, New York.The 18-person group traveled to the remote Department of Jinotega, 105 miles north of Managua and one of the poorest regions in Nicaragua. Nearly 60 percent of Jinotega’s residents live in extreme poverty, and for most people, a safe and solid home is only a dream. Homes are usually cobbled together with scrap materials. They are generally overcrowded, lack running water and appropriate sanitation facilities, have dirt floors and barely keep the rain out. The group constructed two cinder-block houses in the rural farming community of El Sasle (population 1,175), located in indigenous territory of Jinotega, where the average education is 4th grade.A highlight of the week was a meeting with Jose Luis Gonzalez, the leader of the indigenous people in the region, who shared the history and stories of his people.Volunteers shovel and sift sand to remove stones in preparation for mixing cement. [left to right: Clarke Bailey, Peter Kizer (in background), Bridges trip leader Hugo Gonzales]. Photo: Paul CantwellWorking tirelessly alongside local masons and community members, the team – composed of nine adults and nine teenagers – built the two houses in just four days, without the assistance of any machinery. Human strength and shovels were the main tools used: they dug and leveled the ground for the floor using just shovels; hauled countless pounds of sand, rocks and water for the cement, which they mixed by hand; and formed block and bucket “brigades” to move the heavy cinder blocks and wet cement from the mixing site to the construction site. The new cinder-block homes have tin roofs, tile floors and locking doors and windows, providing a hurricane and earthquake resistant secure home.Two multi-generational families were the proud, appreciative, beneficiaries of the two houses. Despite the exhausting work and the very basic living conditions, the volunteers were elated and felt that they benefited just as much as the recipients of the homes. And, that’s why so many of them keep returning.Simon Cantwell, four-time trip participant who will be a freshman at Boston University in the fall, said: “Every year I go into the trip thinking that it will likely be my last. However, I seem to leave Nicaragua with my mind changed. The first few times I think I went entirely because I enjoyed the idea of giving to others who weren’t as lucky as I, but now after four trips I realize I go back mostly because I love seeing such pure joy in a place that is so poor.”Cement was mixed by hand, a strenuous job requiring many helping hands and brute strength. Photo: Linnet TseTrip participants were Clarke Bailey, Skye Bailey, Carla Berry, Madison Blaine, Paul Boese, Sam Boese, Freya Cantwell, Paul Cantwell, Simon Cantwell, Luke Clay, Chase Danford, Heather Gardiner, David Kingsley, Kat Kingsley, Peter Kizer, Scott Roper, Shannon Roper, and Linnet Tse.— Linnet Tse is a member of St. John’s Church in Larchmont, New York. This was her third trip to Nicaragua. Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Shreveport, LA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Curate Diocese of Nebraska Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Belleville, IL Rector Tampa, FL Anglican Communion yvan francois says: The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Smithfield, NC last_img read more

Imprisoned blogger told he can count on continuing support in letter on first anniversary of arrest

first_img EgyptMiddle East – North Africa Reporters Without Borders secretary-general Robert Ménard has sent a message of support to imprisoned Egyptian blogger Kareem Nabil Suleiman on the first anniversary of his arrest on 6 November 2006. Suleiman, better known his blog name of Kareem Amer, was sentenced on 22 February to three years in prison for “inciting hatred of Islam” and another year for insulting President Hosni Mubarak.The letter, sent to him via his lawyers, talks about the press freedom organisation’s campaign for his release.”Dear Kareem,Your arrest outraged many free speech groups, human rights organisations, bloggers and diplomats. Reporters Without Borders has been following your case and has been supporting you for the past year and we will continue to campaign on your behalf.United Nations secretary-general Ban-Ki Moon promised us that he would intercede on your behalf with the Egyptian government during his visit in March, just after you were sentenced. The Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights assured us that your case was raised with the Egyptian authorities at the start of May by the Special Rapporteur on Freedom of Expression. In France, President Nicolas Sarkozy is aware of your plight and has told us “this question is and will continue to be regularly raised during my contacts with the Egyptian authorities and will, in particular, always be raised during my interviews with my Egyptian counterpart.”In the light of these efforts, we hope there will be positive developments in your case.On 9 November, we will take part in an international demonstration being organised in Paris by your support committee to reiterate the request for your release that we already sent to the Egyptian justice minister and public prosecutor in February, after you were sentenced.Please continue to send us news of yourself. We consider your news to be very valuable and it is evidence of your continuing struggle for free expression. Our campaign on your behalf continues and will only get stronger.You may count on our friendship and support.” Detained woman journalist pressured by interrogator, harassed by prison staff to go further Less press freedom than ever in Egypt, 10 years after revolution News Al Jazeera journalist Mahmoud Hussein back home after four years in prison Follow the news on Egypt November 6, 2007 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Imprisoned blogger told he can count on continuing support in letter on first anniversary of arrest Reporters Without Borders secretary-general Robert Ménard has sent a message of support to imprisoned Egyptian blogger Kareem Nabil Suleiman on the first anniversary of his arrest on 6 November 2006. Suleiman, better known his blog name of Kareem Amer, was sentenced on 22 February to three years in prison for “inciting hatred of Islam” and another year for insulting President Hosni Mubarak. News February 6, 2021 Find out more EgyptMiddle East – North Africa Organisation Help by sharing this information News News RSF_en Receive email alerts February 1, 2021 Find out more January 22, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

Limerick paramedic in second New York rescue

first_imgNewsLimerick paramedic in second New York rescueBy John Keogh – July 22, 2015 717 TAGSFDNYlimericknew yorkNiall O’Shaughnessy WhatsApp Print Facebook RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Advertisement Twitter Limerick Artist ‘Willzee’ releases new Music Video – “A Dream of Peace” Previous articleRugby – Schmidt to remain with Ireland until 2017Next articleGet Foxjaw to Electric Picnic 2015 John Keoghhttp://www.limerickpost.ie center_img WATCH: “Everyone is fighting so hard to get on” – Pat Ryan on competitive camogie squads Email Vanishing Ireland podcast documenting interviews with people over 70’s, looking for volunteers to share their stories Linkedin  A LIMERICK paramedic living in New York who last year helped to rescue a Belfast woman trapped under a subway train has made headlines again after jumping into the Hudson River to save a drowning woman.Niall O’Shaughnessy (38), who lives in Long Island, went into the river last Monday to save a woman aged in her late 20s to early 30s who had jumped into the water.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up The FDNY paramedic team had arrived on the scene within minutes of the incident and spotted the woman in the water clinging onto a life ring.Speaking to a New York newspaper, Mr O’Shaughnessy said: “This was my first time I jumped in the water (for a rescue). I have no idea why she jumped in, my concern was to just get her out.”“She was very tired and started to let go of it (the life ring). My biggest concern was making sure she was OK and that she didn’t submerge.”A spokesperson for the FDNY said that Mr O’Shaughnessy “kicked off his boots, clipped off his radio and jumped in” when he realised that the woman was in danger of going under.“He saw her having an incredible amount of difficulty and his brain took over. All that mattered was rescuing her,” added the spokesperson.The woman was taken to hospital and was said to be in a stable condition. Limerick’s National Camogie League double header to be streamed live Predictions on the future of learning discussed at Limerick Lifelong Learning Festival Limerick Ladies National Football League opener to be streamed livelast_img read more

Ours A Politically Sensitive State, Hardly Anyone Completely Apolitical, Political Leaning No Bar To Post Of Non-Hereditary Temple Trustee: Kerala HC

first_imgNews UpdatesOurs A Politically Sensitive State, Hardly Anyone Completely Apolitical, Political Leaning No Bar To Post Of Non-Hereditary Temple Trustee: Kerala HC Lydia Suzanne Thomas20 March 2021 11:04 PMShare This – x”..Perhaps that may be the reason why Kerala has become a State of political swinging.”In a ruling on Friday, the Kerala High Court drew a firm line of distinction between being a sympathiser/being ideologically aligned to a political party and actually holding a post in a political outfit. A Division Bench of Justices CT Ravikumar and K Haripal made certain pertinent observations in this respect, while also touching upon the nature of political life in the state…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginIn a ruling on Friday, the Kerala High Court drew a firm line of distinction between being a sympathiser/being ideologically aligned to a political party and actually holding a post in a political outfit. A Division Bench of Justices CT Ravikumar and K Haripal made certain pertinent observations in this respect, while also touching upon the nature of political life in the state of Kerala. While emphasizing that a temple or its precincts could not be made a place for political parties to give asylum to its workers, the Court remarked, “…ours being a highly politically sensitive State, hardly any person can be traced, who is completely apolitical or who may not have his own independent political views.” Continuing on this theme, the Court explained that shifting political leanings among people in the State was perhaps a reason that Kerala was a state of political swinging. “There may be persons having permanent political ideologies or views whereas there may be equal number of persons who hold views according to the issues involved. Perhaps that may be the reason why Kerala has become a State of political swinging.” The Division Bench underscored, however, that its observations were made in the context of the central question in the proceedings. In light of the observations, the Court summarised that holding political views or sympathizing with a political denomination cannot be held a disqualification for nominating anyone to such a post. The Court was hearing a plea moved by a Suresh K, who approached the High Court asserting he was a devotee of the Sree Vairamcode Bhagavathi devaswom, supervised by the Malabar Devaswom. He claimed that certain non-heriditary trustees appointed by the Commissioner of the Malabar devaswom to the Temple Trust Board were active politicans. Active politicians were ineligible for appointment as per the Commissioner’s notification inviting applications, it was submitted. After the petitioner’s initial challenge to the appointments that was submitted to the State Government failed, he filed a petition before he High Court. To buttress his contention that the persons in question for active politicians, the petitioner placed on record certain photographs. Holding that the evidence presented was vague the Court stressed the need for foolproof evidence when such an allegation was made. The Court highlighted that no evidence of the persons in question being office bearers of a political party were brought on record. In this light, the Court declared, “..even assuming that respondents 7 to 9 have some political leaning or rather they are sympathizers of a political party, that fact will not disentitle them to be considered for appointment as non-hereditary trustees. There is clear distinction between sympathizing with a political party and indulging in active participation in the activities of the party. The taboo under subclause (g) of clause 3 of Ext.P2 will be attracted only if they are active politicians or are office bearers of a political party, for which absolutely no evidence is forthcoming…” Highlighting that the Malabar Devaswom’s Inspector had duly interviewed and examined the affidavits submitted by the applicants, the Court opined that the petition was without merit. On this, among other grounds, the Court dismissed the petition. CASE NAME: Suresh K. v. State of Kerala and Ors. COUNSEL FOR PETITIONER: Advocates J.Julian Xavier, Firoz K.Robin, Pious Mathew, Roy Joseph, Aannies Mathew, Advocate E.Haridas COUNSEL FOR RESPONDENTS: Sr GP Renil Anto Kandamkulathy for the State, Advocate R.Lakshmi Narayan for the Malabar Devaswom and its Office Bearers, Advocate M.P.Prabhakaran (Palakkad) for the persons whose appointement was challenged. Clickhere to download the judgmentSubscribe to LiveLaw, enjoy Ad free version and other unlimited features, just INR 599 Click here to Subscribe. All payment options available.loading….Next Storylast_img read more

€35,000 allocated to deliver digital pilot initiative at Malin Beg

first_img Journey home will be easier – Paul Hegarty Google+ €35,000 in funding has been announced today for Donegal as part of the Department of Rural and Community Development’s Digital Innovation Programme.Over €450,000 has been allocated to local authorities across the country to deliver 13 pilot digital initiatives.The funding for Donegal will go towards improving a Mobile Coverage Blackspot at Malin Beg.The projects aim to benefit rural and urban communities through digital technology. News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th Homepage BannerNews Facebook Previous articleEx Donegal priest sentenced to 9 months after assaulting girlNext articleDonegal receives €2.4m to enhance historial maritime tourism News Highland €35,000 allocated to deliver digital pilot initiative at Malin Beg Twitter Facebook WhatsApp WhatsAppcenter_img By News Highland – November 2, 2018 Pinterest DL Debate – 24/05/21 RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Harps come back to win in Waterford Twitter Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows Google+ Pinterest Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic last_img read more

Haulage HR prepared for major recruitment crisis

first_imgRelated posts:No related photos. HR professionals in the UK’s haulage industry are bracing themselves for arecruitment crisis when the EU Road Transport Directive is introduced in Marchnext year. The Road Haulage Association (RHA) predicts an extra 60,600 drivers will berequired to compensate for a reduction in driving hours to 48 hours a week. Lorry drivers currently work around 60 hours a week, and the compulsory48-hour average will be calculated over a four-month reference period. Chris Campbell of the Road Haulage and Distribution Training Council said:”Haulage industry employers are waiting for a recruitment timebomb to gooff. “Thousands more drivers will be needed to ensure haulage firms achievethe same productivity in a significantly shorter working week.” The RHA forecasts that the directive will increase operating costs by 5.6per cent per year through extra wages and the need to pay existing drivershigher salaries to make up for a reduction in weekly salaries. Colin Pirie, who manages personnel and logistics at the Aberdeen-basedhaulier Balmoral Group, said: “We will be severely affected by thedirective as our drivers work long shifts, trucking freight to and fromEngland. “We will have to recruit four extra drivers which may force haulagerates up by 22 per cent.” HR professionals are now trying to alleviate the crisis by recruitingdrivers through training schemes funded by the Government’s Road HaulageModernisation Fund. By Andy Moorewww.dft.gov.uk Haulage HR prepared for major recruitment crisisOn 23 Mar 2004 in Personnel Today Comments are closed. Previous Article Next Articlelast_img read more

Clay mineral provenance of sediments in the southern Bellingshausen Sea reveals drainage changes of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet during the Late Quaternary

first_imgThe Belgica Trough and the adjacent Belgica Trough Mouth Fan in the southern Bellingshausen Sea (Pacific sector of the Southern Ocean) mark the location of a major outlet for the West Antarctic Ice Sheet during the Late Quaternary. The drainage basin of an ice stream that advanced through Belgica Trough across the shelf during the last glacial period comprised an area exceeding 200,000 km(2) in the West Antarctic hinterland. Previous studies, mainly based on marine-geophysical data from the continental shelf and slope, focused on the bathymetry and seafloor bedforms, and the reconstruction of associated depositional processes and ice-drainage patterns. In contrast, there was only sparse information from seabed sediments recovered by coring. In this paper, we present lithological and clay mineralogical data of 21 sediment cores collected from the shelf and slope of the southern Bellingshausen Sea. Most cores recovered three lithological units, which can be attributed to facies types deposited under glacial, transitional and seasonally open-marine conditions. The clay mineral assemblages document coinciding changes in provenance. The relationship between the clay mineral assemblages in the subglacial and proglacial sediments on the shelf and the glacial diamictons on the slope confirms that a grounded ice stream advanced through Belgica Trough to the shelf break during the past, thereby depositing detritus eroded in the West Antarctic hinterland as soft till on the shelf and as glaciogenic debris flows on the slope. The thinness of the overlying transitional and seasonally open-marine sediments in the cores suggests that this ice advance occurred during the last glacial period. Clay mineralogical, acoustic sub-bottom and seismic data furthermore demonstrate that the palaeo-ice stream probably reworked old sedimentary strata, including older tills, on the shelf and incorporated this debris into its till bed. The geographical heterogeneity of the clay mineral assemblages in the sub- and proglacial diamictons and gravelly deposits indicates that they were eroded from underlying sedimentary strata of different ages. These strata may have been deposited during either different phases of the last glacial period or different glacial and interglacial periods. Additionally, the clay mineralogical heterogeneity of the soft tills recovered on the shelf suggests that the drainage area of the palaeo-ice stream flowing through Belgica Trough changed through time. (C) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.last_img read more

Greenland records of aerosol source and atmospheric lifetime changes from the Eemian to the Holocene

first_imgThe Northern Hemisphere experienced dramatic changes during the last glacial, featuring vast ice sheets and abrupt climate events, while high northern latitudes during the last interglacial (Eemian) were warmer than today. Here we use high-resolution aerosol records from the Greenland NEEM ice core to reconstruct the environmental alterations in aerosol source regions accompanying these changes. Separating source and transport effects, we find strongly reduced terrestrial biogenic emissions during glacial times reflecting net loss of vegetated area in North America. Rapid climate changes during the glacial have little effect on terrestrial biogenic aerosol emissions. A strong increase in terrestrial dust emissions during the coldest intervals indicates higher aridity and dust storm activity in East Asian deserts. Glacial sea salt aerosol emissions in the North Atlantic region increase only moderately (50%), likely due to sea ice expansion. Lower aerosol concentrations in Eemian ice compared to the Holocene are mainly due to shortened atmospheric residence time, while emissions changed little.last_img read more

THE CIRCUMSPECT CAVEMAN

first_imgTHE CIRCUMSPECT CAVEMANGavel Gamut By Jim RedwineIf you read last week’s column you probably noted the current general topic is judicial education. Specifically, the focus of last week’s session was the definition of what is a judge and how did the concept of judging arise? We went back about 130,000 years to the hypothetical, and questionable, the theory that Homo sapiens may have existed in North America before it had a name.The reason we are delving into these arcane mysteries is that the National Judicial College in Reno, Nevada has tasked some of its faculty, including me, with teaching an annual on-line course to judges from across North America. By design, the course concentrates on general and basic aspects of what judges do and how and why they do it. So let us return to last week’s pedagogical construct of a truly elemental judicial system, that is, caveman justice.You may recall we visited three hypothetical aboriginal families inhabiting a tiny cluster of huts. A dispute between two of the families had arisen over possession and use of certain flowers. Those two families agreed that instead of fighting with clubs they would agree to submit the matter to a member of the third family for a decision; voila, the first judge and the first court. But why would the dueling litigants accept the judge’s decision? Why not just ignore the judge’s imposed resolution and go back to trial by combat. How could the ancient society have confidence the judge was right, or if not completely right, at least fair? Judicial ethics were born. And that was the subject matter of this week’s NJC class.If we assume the judge wants his or her family to enjoy the benefits of a peaceful community and we assume cooperation on such things as mastodon hunts by everyone is a benefit to all while bashing skulls is a benefit to none, we can find a basis for accepting a decision by an impartial judge. The rub, of course, is how to ensure the contentious parties believe the judge is impartial. That is why a large part of America’s judicial system places restraints and requirements on the behavior of judges. Judges, just as our caveman judge, have no armies nor do they have the power to raise revenue. All judges have to enforce their decisions is public confidence in the judge, or, at least, the overall judicial system.So with our nascent judicial system from 130,000 years ago, our judge could not play favorites and the two contesting parties would have to have confidence he/she was, in fact, impartial. People can accept a less than ideal resolution of their legal problem if they are convinced it was arrived at without prejudice. Therefore, our caveman judge must not talk to one family about the dispute outside the presence of the other family. And the judge must not accept favors from either family. Also, the judge must not voice any out of “court” opinions about the merits of the case.Well, Gentle Reader, you might surmise there are a few more legal system details for mankind to work out other than our caveman justice. However, it all comes down to our judges must not only be fair, but we must also believe they are fair.For more Gavel Gamut articles go to www.jamesmredwine.com Or “Like” us on Facebook at JPegRanchBooks&KnittingFacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more