Battlefields around the world are finding new purpose as parks and…

first_img Please enter your comment! Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate Todd Lookingbill is a member of the American Association of GeographersThe association is a funding partner of The Conversation US.[ Expertise in your inbox. Sign up for The Conversation’s newsletter and get a digest of academic takes on today’s news, every day. ]Todd Lookingbill, Associate Professor of Geography and the Environment, University of Richmond and Peter Smallwood, Associate Professor of Biology, University of RichmondThis article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article. You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Veteran’s Day 2019By Todd Lookingbill, and Peter Smallwood, University of RichmondThe horrors of war are all too familiar: lives lost, homes destroyed, entire communities forced to flee. Yet as time passes, places that once were sites of death and destruction can become peaceful natural refuges.One of the deadliest battles fought on U.S. soil, for example, was the Battle of Gettysburg. Tens of thousands of men were killed or wounded in three days of fighting. Over 150 years later, millions of visitors have toured Gettysburg Battlefield.Across the U.S., 25 national battlefield and military parks have been established to protect battlefield landscapes and memorialize the past. Increasingly, visitors to these sites are attracted as much by their natural beauty as their historical legacy.Our new book, “Collateral Values: The Natural Capital Created by Landscapes of War,” describes the benefits to society when healthy natural habitats develop on former battlefields and other military landscapes, such as bases and security zones. Environmental scientist Gary Machlis coined the phrase “collateral values” – a spin on the military expression “collateral damage” – to describe the largely unintended and positive consequences of protecting these lands.These benefits include opportunities for picnicking, hiking and bird watching. More importantly, former military lands can support wildlife conservation, reduce water and air pollution, enhance pollination of natural and agricultural areas and help regulate a warming climate.Watershed adventure camp at Staunton River Battlefield State Park, Virginia.Virginia State Parks, CC BYFrom battlefields to parksIn addition to federally protected sites, hundreds of battlefields in the U.S. are preserved by states, local governments and nonprofits like the American Battlefield Trust. Collectively, these sites represent an important contribution to the nation’s public lands.Preserved battlefields include old fort sites, like the 33 that have been designated public lands in Oklahoma and Texas, marking wars fought between European settlers and Native Americans. They also include coastal defense forts built in the first half of the 1800s along the Atlantic and Pacific seaboards. While some battlefield parks are quite large, others are small sites in urban settings.Internationally, the United Kingdom has an active program to preserve its battlefields, some centuries old. Other Western European countries have preserved World War I and World War II battlefields.For example, one of the most brutal battles of WWI was fought in Verdun, France. That trench warfare site is now 25,000 acres of regenerated forest that attracts more than a quarter-million visitors annually. It protects a biologically rich landscape, including wetlands, orchids, birds, bats, newts, frogs, toads, insects, mushrooms and “survivor trees” that still bear scars of war.Landscape in Verdun Forest.Lamiot, CC BY-SABorders: The Iron CurtainThe largest, most ambitious plan in Europe for transforming a military border centers on the Iron Curtain – a line of guard towers, walls, minefields and fences that stretched for thousands of miles, from Norway’s border with the Soviet Union above the Arctic Circle down to the Mediterranean coastal border between Greece and Albania.Communist Russia and its allies claimed they had to build a system of military barriers to defend against the NATO alliance of Western European countries and the U.S. But keeping their own citizens in was equally as important. Hundreds died trying to escape.The collapse of the USSR in 1991 ended the Cold War, and the utility of the Iron Curtain and associated military facilities. With the fall of the Berlin Wall that divided the city into halves, a reunified Germany began to develop its section of the Iron Curtain into a system of conservation areas and nature trails, known as the European Green Belt initiative.One great challenge of this project was balancing the values of conserving nature while preserving the tragic historical legacy of conflict. Most efforts to build collateral values on former landscapes must grapple with this trade-off.Iron Curtain Greenway: Europeans are creating a system of parks and natural areas stretching across the continent, all connected by the greenswards that have grown along the former Iron Curtain.European Green Belt Association, CC BYOther militarized borders around the globe are also becoming conservation sites. For example, the Demilitarized Zone between North and South Korea has been strictly off-limits for people for decades, allowing it to grow into the most important, albeit unofficial, biodiversity reserve on the Korean peninsula.Similarly, forests have grown up in the extensive minefield created along the Iran-Iraq border during those nations’ war in the 1980s. These forests support Asian leopards and other rare wildlife species. There are proposals to formally protect them as nature reserves.Hope after tragedyAs open space becomes scarce in many parts of the U.S., Civil War battlefield parks have become havens for grassland birds like this grasshopper sparrow.NPS/Sasha RobinsonThe ecosystems of protected areas, such as parks and preserves, provide vital benefits for humans and nature. Unfortunately, the world is in danger of losing at least one-third of its protected areas to development and other threats. Recognizing the collateral values that have developed on protected former battlefields and border zones may help reduce degradation and loss of these lands.One recent study estimates that nearly 1 million square miles – 5% of the Earth’s dry land surface – is currently designated as military training areas. These zones could be protected with relatively little investment when combined with social, cultural and political goals, such as memorializing historical events, and could become ecologically valuable places.No one should forget the brutality of the conflicts that gave rise to these landscapes. However, given the scale of threats to natural habitats around the world, conservationists cannot ignore opportunities to cultivate and preserve natural places – even those that arise from the horrors of war. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Share on Facebook Tweet on Twittercenter_img The Anatomy of Fear TAGSBattlefieldsThe ConversationVeteran’s Day 2019 Previous articleProperty Appraiser’s Office to return $1.87 million to Orange CountyNext articleApopka Police Department Arrest Report Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 Please enter your name herelast_img read more

Breaking News: Orange County deputies looking for suspect in early morning…

first_img LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply From the Orange County Sheriff’s OfficeThe Orange County Sheriff’s Office responded to an early morning shooting that resulted in gunshot wounds to a woman.According to the OCSO news release, this morning at approximately 5:17 am, a deputy from the OCSO was on pro-active patrol in the area of Hermit Smith Road and North Orange Blossom Trail (between Apopka and Zellwood) when they heard multiple gunshots being fired.  Within minutes a 911 call for service was received and a victim was found in the area.  A 23-year-old female sustained at least one gunshot wound and was transported to Orlando Regional Medical Center with non-life-threatening injuries.  Units are still investigating, but there is no suspect description available.The OCSO did not release the name of the shooting victim.This is a breaking story, and no other details are known at this time. The Apopka Voice will update this story as more information is known. Please enter your comment! You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 The Anatomy of Fear Please enter your name here TAGSapopkaGunshot victimOrange County Sheriff’s OfficeZellwood Previous articleIs Becker running for Mayor of Apopka?Next articleHow to Avoid the Most Common Causes of Car Accidents Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.last_img read more

Copper House / Charles Rose Architects

first_img “COPY” Copper House / Charles Rose Architects Houses Year:  Projects 2004 CopyHouses, Renovation•Belmont, United States Photographs ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/559300/copper-house-charles-rose-architects Clipboard Save this picture!Courtesy of Charles Rose Architects+ 20 Share CopyAbout this officeCharles Rose ArchitectsOfficeFollowProductsWoodSteel#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousesRefurbishmentRenovationBelmontHousesRefurbishmentRenovationUnited StatesPublished on October 25, 2014Cite: “Copper House / Charles Rose Architects” 25 Oct 2014. ArchDaily. Accessed 11 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Read commentsBrowse the CatalogFaucetshansgroheKitchen Mixers – Aquno Select M81Vinyl Walls3MVinyl Finishes in HealthPartners Regions HospitalPartitionsSkyfoldWhere to Increase Flexibility in SchoolsCoffee tablesBoConceptMadrid Coffee Table AD19SkylightsLAMILUXFlat Roof Exit Comfort DuoMetallicsTrimoMetal Panels for Roofs – Trimoterm SNVSkylightsVELUX CommercialModular Skylights in Atelier Zimmerlistrasse OfficeStonesNeolithSintered Stone – Iron Moss – Iron CollectionCeramicsTerrealTerracotta Facade in Manchester HospitalWoodBlumer LehmannConsulting and Engineering in Wood ProjectsGlassBendheimLuminous Mirrored GlassWire MeshTwentinoxMetal Mesh – Golf Romeo 7More products »Read commentsSave世界上最受欢迎的建筑网站现已推出你的母语版本!想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my streamcenter_img Copper House / Charles Rose ArchitectsSave this projectSaveCopper House / Charles Rose Architects “COPY” ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/559300/copper-house-charles-rose-architects Clipboard Year:  2004 United States Architects: Charles Rose Architects Year Completion year of this architecture project Photographs:  Courtesy of Charles Rose ArchitectsSave this picture!Courtesy of Charles Rose ArchitectsRecommended ProductsFiber Cements / CementsApavisaTiles – Nanofusion 7.0Fiber Cements / CementsSwisspearlSwisspearl Largo Fiber Cement PanelsMetallicsSculptformClick-on Battens in Ivanhoe ApartmentsEnclosures / Double Skin FacadesAlucoilStructural Honeycomb Panels – LarcoreMaterials: Bright copper;cedar; painted steel; mahogany and Alaskan yellow cedar windows; flagstone; beech; bamboo; rosewood; patinated stainless steel.Save this picture!SectionScope: Major addition, renovation. Contemporary two-story bar joined to existing three-story Colonial; on 1st floor new kitchen, dining and living space; master bedroom and individual offices for couple on 2nd; renovation of spaces adjoining addition to match open, contemporary feel.Save this picture!Courtesy of Charles Rose ArchitectsCharles Rose Architects rarely work on renovations. In this case, the original house was a Colonial box with vinyl siding; it was poorly sited, and a garage cut it off from a spacious yard. Yet it had charm: cozy rooms, a downstairs bedroom suite, and ample usable space. The project called for—in essence—adding a house to the existing house, and the complexity and challenge proved too hard to resist.Save this picture!Floor PlanOur design created a slot for the addition by demolishing the garage and using surplus driveway space. This move anchored the new house in the landscape while ensuring that it wouldn’t eat up valuable green space, despite its large scale. The most challenging aspect was one of fit: by style and scale. Stylistically, we were marrying a modern glass and copper house to a Colonial. Moreover, integration was daunting: the high-ceilings and open volumes of the planned addition did not align with the Colonial’s tighter and more compressed spaces.Save this picture!Courtesy of Charles Rose ArchitectsTo confront the central challenge—of stitching together old and new—we used strategies that both hid and heightened transitions. Outside, we put a new wrapper on the Colonial: a cedar box. We kept practically everything as it was: window frames became sculptural indentations; old panes were replaced with single sheets of glass. Inside, we put a three-story atrium, topped by six large skylights – where old and new meet. We made this the formal entryway: The front door leads visitors into a small vestibule that opens into the atrium. A steel-and-glass stair climbs from the stone atrium floor to upper level of the addition. A second sculptural stair—a steel-and-glass bridge—crosses the atrium and links the second floors in the addition and the Colonial, heightening the contrast. A curtain wall of glass runs the length of the kitchen and living spaces, bringing the outdoors inside. The plan is open; the ground-floor stair, granite dining room server and bluestone fireplace are designed to delineate room areas.Save this picture!Courtesy of Charles Rose ArchitectsProject gallerySee allShow lessThe Principals Install Sound Reactive, Silver-Coated “Quilt” at NeuehouseArchitecture NewsArchitect Develops the World’s First HoverboardArchitecture News Share ArchDailylast_img read more

North Carolina protests confront Clinton, Trump

first_imgOn July 5, protests confronted both capitalist presidential candidates, who were holding campaign rallies in North Carolina.In Charlotte, N.C., Hillary Clinton spoke alongside President Barack Obama at the first joint rally the two have held. They both spoke on the necessity of stopping Donald Trump and lauded their own supposedly progressive positions on immigration and other issues. After their formal talks, they came to greet people who had filled the overflow space at the Charlotte Convention Center to capacity.A group of teachers and students with the #Not1More coalition held up a banner that read, “Release them now, stop deporting our students, #FreeWildin” and chanted, “Stop deportations!” Their action stopped Clinton’s remarks to the overflow audience.The #Not1More group demands a moratorium on deportations, the immediate release of the 12 students who are currently being held in detention centers by Immigration and Customs Enforcement, and for Hillary Clinton to stay true to her promise of ending the raids that seize students for deportation.Currently, ICE is holding nine students from North Carolina and three from Georgia in detention. In total, these students have been in ICE facilities for the past six months. Wildin Acosta — one of the students from Durham, N.C. — was sentenced to 45 days of solitary confinement for helping an inmate translate a letter into English.Recent graduate Diana Vieyra, who was protesting, told Workers World she participated because, “I felt it was important for me, as an undocumented student, who had the privilege of graduating high school, that the 12 other students held in detention centers by ICE be given the same opportunity.” She urged Clinton to follow through on her promise, saying, “Hillary has come out against the immigration raids, as well as met with Dreamers, but it’s now time for her to actually meet our demands.”Defy thunderstorm to condemn TrumpLater that same day, racist billionaire Donald Trump held a campaign rally at Memorial Auditorium in downtown Raleigh, N.C. Despite heavy thunderstorms, people held a spirited rally directly in front of the venue for several hours.Chants of “No Trump! No KKK! No racist, fascist USA!” and “Hey hey! Ho ho! Deportations have got to go!” rang out and confronted the crowd as they filed out of the auditorium at the end of the rally. A brief standoff ensued as Trump supporters shouted racist slogans and chants at the demonstrators, who refused to give up any ground.Many from North Carolina are planning to mobilize to join protests in Cleveland at the Republican National Convention and in Philadelphia at the Democratic National Convention, later this month. Both Trump and Clinton have also made it clear that they will be returning often to the state until the elections in November — and organizers have announced their intentions to organize protests to disrupt, confront and shut down these rallies of the capitalist candidates every time and anywhere they are held in the state.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

Police: Woman killed after stumbling across robbery while playing “Pokemon Go”

first_imgadamkaz/iStock(ALBUQUERQUE, N.M.) — A 21-year-old New Mexico woman was playing Pokemon Go with her boyfriend over the weekend when she was fatally shot after witnessing a robbery in progress, according to police.Cayla Campos and her boyfriend, who police identified by his first name, Sidney, were driving near Bianchetti Park in Albuquerque, New Mexico, late Friday night when they allegedly witnessed two armed robbers targeting someone in another vehicle, police said Monday.Campos turned her car around and attempted to flee the scene, but the suspects spotted her and opened fire on her vehicle. She was struck by gunfire, causing her to crash into a nearby home, according to police. The suspects got away and there were no leads as of Monday night, police said.Investigators with the Albuquerque Police Department issued a statement Monday asking for the public’s help in finding the shooters.“The two vehicles involved were a red car (possibly a Ford Mustang) and a silver four door sedan,” the statement said. “APD is asking the victims of the ‘robbery’ or anyone else with information to please come forward. They can contact 242-COPS with information.”People who knew Campos described her as a playful young woman who dreamed of becoming a dentist someday. Cody Bell, who called Campos his “closest friend,” said her death has devastated their community.“She was just such an amazing person,” Bell told local station KRQE-TV. “I am really trying hard not to break down right now. … I feel like there is a piece of me that is missing now.”“Just knowing that I am never going to see her again or talk to her. … I am just sorry that her life was taken away so soon,” he added.Bell said Campos was a devoted Pokemon Go player who would always swing by the park to play before heading home at night.“Her and her boyfriend always make a loop around this park before they go home and play Pokemon Go because their apartment is literally right there,” Bell said.Other players of the popular game said the death has put the community on edge.“It definitely makes me think twice about where and when I’m playing,” Kody Love, a fellow Pokemon Go player, told Albuquerque ABC affiliate KOAT-TV. “There’s a lot of rough neighborhoods and times you probably shouldn’t be out.” Copyright © 2019, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

Donations flood in from Ireland to Navajo Nation in repayment of centuries-old bond

first_imgKindred Spirits Monument/Google Maps Street ViewBy CHEYENNE HASLETT, ABC NEWS(NEW YORK) — A relationship between Native Americans and Ireland that dates back nearly two centuries has been revived once again during a time of desperate need.A GoFundMe page for Navajo and Hopi families devastated by coronavirus has raised over $2.6 million as of Wednesday, in no small part because of the hundreds of donations coming from names like O’Neill, Hanrahan, O’Leary and Munro.“At Ireland’s time of need during the Great Hunger of the 1840s, Native American people donated to the famine relief effort even though they themselves were still living in hardship. Their generosity will never be forgotten,” Dermot Burke wrote on the GoFundMe page on May 3, along with a $30 donation to the Navajo and Hopi relief efforts.“When Ireland was in need you understood what Solidarity really looked like,” read the following message from Alan Hopkins, along with $20.Navajo Nation has seen an increasingly challenging rise of coronavirus cases since the outbreak began in early March, spreading quickly and severely on a reservation that lacks running water for nearly a third of residents, creating barriers to hand-washing, and where crowded multi-generational homes can make social distancing all but impossible.Navajo Nation, which has access to only about 20 intensive care unit beds for a population of nearly 30,000, has pressed for help from the federal government in combating the spread. Neither the Navajo nor any tribes had received any of the $8 billion of aid granted to them in the CARES Act, the nation’s coronavirus relief package, until Tuesday, and tribes are still waiting on 40% of the funds.“The heartache is real. We have lost so many of our sacred Navajo elders and youth to COVID-19. It is truly devastating. And a dark time in history for our Nation,” Vanessa Tulley, an organizer for the Navajo and Hopi family fundraiser, wrote on the GoFundMe page in May.“In moments like these, we are so grateful for the love and support we have received from all around the world. Acts of kindness from indigenous ancestors passed being reciprocated nearly 200 years later through blood memory and interconnectedness. Thank you, IRELAND, for showing solidarity and being here for us,” she wrote, as donations from across the pond continued to roll in.The connection between Ireland and Native American tribes dates back to 1847, when the Choctaw Nation raised $170, which translates to $5,350 today, for a relief fund that was sending food and clothing from the U.S. to Ireland during the Great Famine, which was estimated to have killed 1 million people during the 1840s.“Adversity often brings out the best in people. We are gratified — and perhaps not at all surprised — to learn of the assistance our special friends, the Irish, are giving to the Navajo and Hopi nations,” the Choctaw tribe said in a statement to ABC News. “Our word for their selfless act is ‘iyyikowa’ — it means serving those in need. We have become kindred spirits with the Irish in the years since the Irish Potato Famine. We hope the Irish, Navajo and Hopi peoples develop lasting friendships, as we have. Sharing our cultures makes the world grow smaller.”At the time, the Choctaw tribe was suffering from the toll the Trail of Tears had taken on its own population. Nearly a quarter of the tribe was wiped out by the 600-mile trek from areas in the Southeast to territory west of the Mississippi after being forcibly evicted from their land by the U.S. government between 1830 and 1834.In the decades since, Choctaw Nation and Ireland have kept up the relationship, continuing to use it to remember the suffering that entwines the two nations’ experiences. In 1992, more than 20 Irish men and women walked the Trail of Tears, raising relief funds for a famine in Somalia, and a few years later, Gary White Deer, a member of the Choctaw Nation, led an annual Famine Walk in Ireland, according to the Irish Times.Then, in 2017, the Irish honored the Choctaw nation with the Kindred Spirits Choctaw Monument, an art installation in Midleton, Ireland, to commemorate the Choctaw donation during the potato famine.“After we lost a fourth of our people coming across the Trail of Tears, we turned around and sent $170 over to the people of Ireland. Now, to me that’s true servant leadership. That’s a type of values that I want to pass on to my kids and to my grandkids,” Choctaw Chief Gary Batton said at the time the monument was installed.“It makes me honored to represent the people that does those type of efforts.”Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

University of Utah Plans To Expand Rice-Eccles Stadium

first_img Brad James Written by Tags: premium seats/Rice-Eccles Stadium Expansion/University of Utah Football November 14, 2018 /Sports News – Local University of Utah Plans To Expand Rice-Eccles Stadium FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailSALT LAKE CITY-Wednesday, the University of Utah announced plans to expand Rice-Eccles Stadium after the university’s Board of Trustees approved a request to pursue bonding.The stadium’s renovation, which is conditional upon financing approval, should be completed prior to the advent of the 2020-21 season.A 2017 feasibility study, which surveyed ticket purchasers, athletic donors, alumni and fans, demonstrated strong community support and a market demand for the expansion.The costs for construction will be covered primarily via fundraising, sponsorships and revenues generated by the new premium seating areas.No state or taxpayer dollars will be used to finance this project.This expansion, which will entail $80 million in expenditures, will consist of demolishing and rebuilding the south end zone.Plans also call for enclosing the bowl by connecting the east and west concourses at the south end.This will increase capacity at Rice-Eccles Stadium to 51,444 from its current 45,807.The Utes’ football team has played before 56 consecutive sellouts, dating back to the 2010 season opener.The season ticket waiting list consists of 3,000 and the Utah ticket office has received more than 1,000 requests from current season ticket holders to add or upgrade seats.Among the changes is the addition of 1,000 chair or bleacher seats which will be available for general purchase in the south end zone.All current season ticket holders will be granted the option to retain their seats.last_img read more

OUSU blacklists White Paper

first_imgOxford University Student Union is finalising its highly critical response to the government’s Higher Education White Paper, “Students at the Heart of the System”, which was published for consultation in June.The document, to be brought before the OUSU council, slams the government for suggesting that students should be consumers rather than partners in their education and for ignoring issues in postgraduate funding and student experience. The White Paper set out the government’s strategy concerning funding, student experience and social mobility.  OUSU however claims the government’s suggestions are “not a sustainable way to drive up quality or protect existing high standards.” They conclude that “the White Paper offers a very incoherent approach to social mobility at both the undergraduate and graduate level.”Hannah Cusworth, OUSU’s Vice President for Access and Academic Affairs, outlined one concern, stating, “The university should be getting the brightest students who have the potential to benefit most from an Oxford education and to be tomorrow’s researchers.” Similarly, OUSU President Martha Mackenzie said that “the headline figure of £9,000 may seem insurmountable” to those applying from non-traditional backgrounds. OUSU have argued that the government need to take this more seriously, as “This radical change is unprecedented, and polling has shown that parents do not understand the new fees regime.”Mackenzie commented, “In the new fee climate students will expect a high quality of education but this will not be achieved through a simple financial transaction. Far more important is that students are seen as genuine partners and are given real influence to share their education.” The response recognises that demand for places will always exceed supply, so consumerist motivation cannot incentivise improvement in educational standards. Oscar Lee, New College JCR President, supported Mackenzie’s stance, arguing, “It could be dangerous to turn students into de facto consumers who are only able to ameliorate the quality of their education by complaining until something is improved.” OUSU stated that positive change “has come through representation, the relationship (between student and tutor) and trust”, rather than value-for-money complaints, citing continuing postgraduate dissatisfaction despite paying fees up to £30,000 per year. OUSU officer Jacob Diggle suggests this “special relationship between students and academics” can lead to positive action, such as the no-confidence motion against David Willetts last term. He fears this relationship could be lost if fees push students to view their tutors merely as service-providers. Second year Regent’s student Ben Hudson was more critical of OUSU, suggesting the idea of a partnership is preferable to a marketised system, but that this “fails to address the problem of unfair access to this partnership.” He suggested that OUSU’s response “lacks the combative edge,” accusing them of attempting to “conciliate the government by agreeing with certain parts of the White Paper”, meaning that “the main point behind the debate is lost.”Diggle denied that OUSU was moderate but suggested that the gentler tone they were forced to use was due to the lack of an effective mandate from the student community pushing for real change.Colin Jackson, co-chair of Oxford University Labour Club, agreed, arguing, “Making a case against the current policy is only the start – now the student body must come together to reach a clear consensus on how we would rather see our degrees funded.”There was no response to requests for a government defence.Oxford University Student Union is finalising its highly critical response to the government’s Higher Education White Paper, “Students at the Heart of the System”, which was published for consultation in June.The document, to be brought before the OUSU council, slams the government for suggesting that students should be consumers rather than partners in their education and for ignoring issues in postgraduate funding and student experience. The White Paper set out the government’s strategy concerning funding, student experience and social mobility.  OUSU however claims the government’s suggestions are “not a sustainable way to drive up quality or protect existing high standards.”They conclude that “the White Paper offers a very incoherent approach to social mobility at both the undergraduate and graduate level.”Hannah Cusworth, OUSU’s Vice President for Access and Academic Affairs, outlined one concern, stating, “The university should be getting the brightest students who have the potential to benefit most from an Oxford education and to be tomorrow’s researchers.” Similarly, OUSU President Martha Mackenzie said that “the headline figure of £9,000 may seem insurmountable” to those applying from non-traditional backgrounds.OUSU have argued that the government need to take this more seriously, as “This radical change is unprecedented, and polling has shown that parents do not understand the new fees regime.”Mackenzie commented, “In the new fee climate students will expect a high quality of education but this will not be achieved through a simple financial transaction. Far more important is that students are seen as genuine partners and are given real influence to share their education.” The response recognises that demand for places will always exceed supply, so consumerist motivation cannot incentivise improvement in educational standards. Oscar Lee, New College JCR President, supported Mackenzie’s stance, arguing, “It could be dangerous to turn students into de facto consumers who are only able to ameliorate the quality of their education by complaining until something is improved.” OUSU stated that positive change “has come through representation, the relationship (between student and tutor) and trust”, rather than value-for-money complaints, citing continuing postgraduate dissatisfaction despite paying fees up to £30,000 per year. OUSU officer Jacob Diggle suggests this “special relationship between students and academics” can lead to positive action, such as the no-confidence motion against David Willetts last term. He fears this relationship could be lost if fees push students to view their tutors merely as service-providers. Second year Regent’s student Ben Hudson was more critical of OUSU, suggesting the idea of a partnership is preferable to a marketised system, but that this “fails to address the problem of unfair access to this partnership.”He suggested that OUSU’s response “lacks the combative edge,” accusing them of attempting to “conciliate the government by agreeing with certain parts of the White Paper”, meaning that “the main point behind the debate is lost.”Diggle denied that OUSU was moderate but suggested that the gentler tone they were forced to use was due to the lack of an effective mandate from the student community pushing for real change.Colin Jackson, co-chair of Oxford University Labour Club, agreed, arguing, “Making a case against the current policy is only the start – now the student body must come together to reach a clear consensus on how we would rather see our degrees funded.”There was no response to requests for a government defence.last_img read more

Annie Teriba to resign all political posts

first_imgWith these incidents I have rightly lost the trust of those who I organise with and fully intend to work to ensure that I both put my politics into practice in my personal relations and to prove to them that I am committed to transformation. As such, it would be wrong of me to accept platforms and access spaces until I have done so.In order to ensure the safety of others, I will be taking a number of steps:i) I breached NUS’s safe spaces policy, so will not be attending future NUS events.ii) I am resigning from all the political positions I hold – from NCAFC’s National Committee and from the NUS’s Black Students’ Committee, and as editor of the No Heterox** zine and as the People of Colour and Racial Equality Officer at Wadham SU, Oxford.iii) I will be stepping back from prominent campaigning in other forums, including‪#‎RhodesMustFall‬ and rs21.iv) I commit to getting help with how I consume alcohol. It is clear that I lack self-awareness and become sexually entitled when I am drunk. This does not excuse my actions, I am wholly responsible for the damage that I have caused.v) I commit to educating myself properly about consent by reading zines and other materials which have kindly been made available to me.vi) I commit to seeking help from perpetrator organisations – for example, I have taken steps to establish contact with RESPECT and will be seeking out organisations who specifically deal with sexual violence.I am deeply sorry for the hurt I caused.Yours, Annie Teriba Annie Teriba, editor of the No Heterox** zine, People of Colour and Racial Equality Officer at Wadham SU, member of both NCAFC’s National Committee and the NUS’s Black Students’ Committee, and third-year Wadham student, has admitted she failed to establish consent for a sex act at this year’s NUS Black Students’ Conference, which ran from 30-31st of May. She also admitted to having been sexually inappropriate under the influence of alcohol prior to this incident.She made the admission in a statement on Facebook, in which she also announced that she would be taking a step back from her political campaigning and resigning all the posts she currently holds. Teriba’s Facebook account was deleted a few hours after posting the statement.Shortly after Teriba’s statement was posted, OUSU Women’s Campaign posted a statement in response. It referred to her comments as “rife with apologism”, and is printed in full below.Annie Teriba has been approached for comment. Wadham College and the University have also been approached for comment. Her full statement can be read here:[TW sexual assault, sexual violence]This statement explains why I will be stepping back from political campaigning from now.(I owe you a proper explanation, so will go into details here which you may find triggering.)At this year’s NUS Black Students’ Conference, I had sex with someone. The other party later informed me that the sex was not consensual. I failed to properly establish consent before every act. I apologise sincerely and profoundly for my actions. I should have taken sufficient steps to ensure that everything I did was consensual. I should have been more attentive to the person’s body language. In failing to clarify that the person consented to our entire encounter, I have caused serious irreparable harm.In a separate incident, in my first year of university, I was alerted to my inappropriate behaviour whilst drunk in a club, where I had touched somebody in a sexual manner without their consent. Therefore this is not an isolated incident. I apologise sincerely and profoundly for my actions. OUSU Women’s Campaign has also issued the following statement:The Women’s Campaign stands behind and believes all survivors of sexual assault and violence – whether or not the incident moves through the courts. Believing and supporting survivors who make the incredibly brave step of sharing their traumatic experience is the first step toward justice: the next is excising abusers and those who enable them from spaces that should be safe for all. Rape apologism manifests in infinite forms: we define it as any discourse that refers to sexual assault as anything other than what it is – unacceptable and appalling abuse. The statement recently shared [above] is, unfortunately, rife with apologism and we do not condone it nor the violence it describes.WomCam is committed to ensuring that liberation spaces remain abuser-free – without our full-hearted commitment to this cause, we have no business campaigning on women’s issues. Any institution that protects abusers at the expense of survivors’ wellbeing is one that must be dismantled and reformed.Moreover, sexual assault is one of the most underreported crimes, especially at universities. Holding those responsible for sexual violence accountable means acknowledging the terrifying fact that violence against women is deeply ingrained in and normalized in our culture: education about the issues, campaigning for the rights of those affected, and continued vigilance about the behavior we do not condone in our organization is the only way forward.Sincerely, the Women’s Campaign CommitteeLucy Delaney, OUSU’s Vice-President for Women, added, “In my capacity as Vice President for Women I am adding my voice to that of the Women’s Campaign in standing behind and believing all survivors of sexual assault and violence, and in committing to keeping liberation spaces free from perpetrators. “In a society which silences survivors and which tolerates rape apologism it is essential that liberation spaces do not harbour or protect abusers, otherwise they are no better than the institutions which perpetuate oppression. In my role, I am committed to ensuring that this happens.”If you have been affected by the content of this article or would like further advice, follow these links:http://www.respectphoneline.org.uk/http://www.oxfordrapecrisis.net/https://ithappenshereoxford.wordpress.com/support/last_img read more

Right down the middle, explained

first_img Research shows how processing food was turning point for humans It’s easy to marvel at the athleticism and power behind a 90 mph fastball, but when Neil Roach watches a baseball game, he sees something else at work: evolution.That ability — to throw an object with great speed and accuracy — is a uniquely human adaptation, one that Roach believes was crucial in our evolutionary past. How, when, and why humans evolved the ability to throw so well is the subject of a study published today in the journal Nature.Roach, who received his Ph.D. from the Harvard Graduate School of Arts and Sciences in June, led the study, working with Madhusudhan Venkadesan of the National Centre for Biological Sciences at the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Michael Rainbow of the Spaulding National Running Center, and Daniel Lieberman, the Edwin M. Lerner II Professor of Biological Sciences at Harvard. The group found that changes to shoulders and arms allowed early humans to more efficiently hunt by throwing projectiles, helping our ancestors become part-time carnivores and paving the way for a host of later adaptations, including increases in brain size and migration out of Africa.“When we started this research, there were essentially two questions we asked: One of them was why are humans so uniquely good at throwing, while all other creatures, including our chimpanzee cousins, are not,” said Roach, now a postdoctoral researcher at George Washington University. “The other question was: How do we do it? What is it about our body that enables this behavior, and can we identify those changes in the fossil record?”What they found, Roach said, was a suite of physical changes — such as the lowering and widening of the shoulders, an expansion of the waist, and a twisting of the humerus — that make humans especially good at throwing.While some of those changes occurred earlier during human evolution, Lieberman said it wasn’t until the appearance of Homo erectus, about 2 million years ago, that they all appeared together. The same period is also marked by some of the earliest signs of effective hunting, suggesting that the ability to throw an object very fast and very accurately played a critical role in the human ability to rise to the top of the food chain.“The ability to throw was one of a handful of changes that enabled us to become carnivores, which then triggered a host of changes that occurred later in our evolution,” Lieberman said. “If we were not good at throwing and running and a few other things, we would not have been able to evolve our large brains, and all the cognitive abilities such as language that come with it. If it were not for our ability to throw, we would not be who we are today.”“The ability to throw was one of a handful of changes that enabled us to become carnivores, which then triggered a host of changes that occurred later in our evolution,” said Daniel Lieberman.To unpack the evolutionary origins of throwing, Roach began with the throwing motion of our closest relatives: chimpanzees.Though they’re known to throw objects underhand, chimps, on rare occasions, do throw overhand, but with much less accuracy and power than the average Little League pitcher, Roach said. Also, chimps throw as a part of display behavior, never when hunting.Part of the reason for chimps’ poor throwing, Lieberman said, is tied to their technique, which in turn is limited by their anatomy. “Chimps throw overhand using either a dart throwing motion, where the elbow is extended, or much like a cricket bowler, where their elbow is kept straight and they generate force by swinging their shoulder.” How fast can we run? Related The Daily Gazette Sign up for daily emails to get the latest Harvard news. Marathon-ready Daniel Lieberman offers evolutionary perspective on Bannister 4-minute mile, human speed limits, and ‘Man Against Horse’ Said Roach: “That led us to studying cricket bowlers and trying to understand what happens when you keep your arm straight, and why that diminishes your throwing ability. Eventually, we began to think that changes in the way the shoulder is oriented with regards to the rest of the body could change the way you generate force when you’re throwing.”To explore those physical changes, Roach and colleagues began by creating a complex model that incorporated current research about the biomechanics of throwing. Using that model, they were able to explore how morphological changes to the body — wider shoulders, arms that are higher or lower on the body, the ability to twist the upper body independently of the hips and legs, and the anatomy of the humerus — affect throwing performance.In addition to the modeling, Roach performed a series of real-world experiments in Lieberman’s Skeletal Biology Lab using members of the Harvard baseball team and a host of braces designed to limit their movements. The idea, Roach explained, was that by restricting certain motions, the players would be forced into a more primitive condition, giving him the opportunity to see how different anatomical shifts contribute to the mechanics of modern throwing.Through a method known as inverse dynamics, Roach and colleagues were able to not only quantify how much restricting certain types of movements affected throwing performance, but were able to trace the effect to specific changes in the mechanics of each player.“We try to push these bits of anatomy back in time, if you will, to see how that affects performance,” Roach said. “The important thing about our experiments is that they went beyond just being able to measure how the restriction affects someone’s ability to throw fast and accurately; they allowed us to figure out the underlying physics. For example, when a thrower’s velocity dropped by 10 percent, we could trace that change back to where it occurred.“In order to test our evolutionary hypotheses, we needed to link the changes we’d seen in the fossil record to performance in terms of throwing,” he continued. “This type of analysis allowed us to do that.”When a pitcher’s arm is cocked, “what they’re doing is stretching the ligaments and tendons that run across their shoulder,” Roach said. “Those tendons and ligaments get loaded up like the elastic bands on a slingshot, and late in the throw they release that energy rapidly and forcefully to rotate the upper arm with extraordinary speed and force.” That rotation is the fastest motion the human body can produce. “The rotation of the humerus can reach up to 9,000 degrees per second, which generates an incredible amount of energy, causing you to rapidly extend your elbow, producing a very fast throw,” Roach said.Among the evolutionary changes that proved key to generating powerful throwing motions, he said, was a twist in the bone of the upper arm and an expanded, mobile waist, which gave early humans the ability to store up and then release more of this elastic energy.“The linchpin is really what’s going on with the shoulder,” Roach said. “When you see the shift from a chimpanzee shoulder to a more relaxed humanlike shoulder, that enables this massive energy storage. Many of the evolutionary changes we studied, whether in the torso or the wrist, may predate Homo erectus, but when we see that final change in the shoulder, that’s what brings it all together.”While the findings help shed light on a critical phase of human evolution, they also offer touch on a hotly debated issue in sports: When it comes to young players, how much throwing is too much?“It’s a tough question to answer,” Roach said. “The real difference, from an evolutionary perspective, is the frequency with which some folks throw now. To successfully learn to throw and use that ability to hunt, our ancestors would need to throw often, but nothing like the 100 or more high-speed throws that some baseball pitchers throw now in the span of a couple of hours.“I think it’s really a case of what we evolved to do being superseded by what we’re now asking athletes to do,” he continued. “Athletes are overusing this capability that gave early humans an evolutionary advantage, and they’re overusing it to the point that injuries are common.”Ultimately, Lieberman said, the evidence points to one clear conclusion: The ability to throw with speed and accuracy is a uniquely human adaptation, one that played an immeasurably important role in human development.“Recent research indicates that stone points — the oldest kind of spear point — are about 500,000 years old,” he said. “But people have been killing animals for at least 2 million years, and eating animals for about 2.6 million years.“That means that for about 1.5 million years, when people hunted, they basically had nothing more lethal to throw than a pointed wooden stick,” he continued. “If you want to kill something with that, you have to be able to throw that pretty hard, and you have to be accurate. Imagine how important it must have been to our ancestors to throw hard and fast.” Big gains in better chewinglast_img read more