Everything to Know About NAB 2016: Cameras, Lenses, Gear, and More

first_imgNAB 2016 has come and gone. Here are ALL of the major announcements from the latest National Association of Broadcasters show.Top image via ShutterstockIt’s tough to imagine how the 2016 NAB show will be remembered. There were no announcements regarding amazing new cinema or broadcast cameras from any of the major manufacturers. In fact, the two biggest camera announcements came from Craft and Lytro — neither known to most audiences.This was a year dedicated to VR, 360-degree video, and stabilization tech. With regards to VR, the future is still up in the air. At the moment, it just isn’t practical for most users to shoot 360-degree footage due to the crippling cost of VR cameras. High-end rigs cost more than a car, and lower-price VR setups still cost as much as an actual production camera. Why buy a six-camera GoPro Omni for $4,999 when I could buy a Canon C100 or a Blackmagic URSA Mini for cheaper?Image via FoMA SystemsThere was some exciting tech announced regarding stabilization. Drones, gimbals, and ARRI’s purchase of the Artemis Trinity all grabbed headlines. There were so many new support rigs, we had to write two different roundups (Support Gear and More Support Gear) – and we still didn’t cover everything.NAB 2016 wasn’t a bust — but it was certainly quiet. After Blackmagic stole all the headlines with the URSA Mini in 2015, Canon positioned themselves to dominate NAB 2016 — but they barely made a blip on the radar. In fact, it was Sony who had all the foot traffic checking out all of their cameras on the floor. Sony was the only major manufacturer to announce a major new camera along with serious updates for their existing line.There are still plenty of shows left this year, like Photokina and IBC. In fact, rumors have Canon releasing a new mirrorless line at Photokina, but the real question is will we ever see the 5D MKIV? Only time will tell. With that wrap up of the event itself, let’s dive into everything worth looking at from NAB 2016.CamerasHere is a quick recap of the latest cameras, for more detailed specs and info check out the biggest camera announcements from NAB 2016.SonySony made a splash at NAB 2016 announcing the HDC-4800, a Super 35mm camera that can shoot up to 480 fps in 4K. They also debuted the PXW-Z150, a UHD camcorder that can shoot 4K footage and HD up to 120 fps. Most readers will be interested in the firmware updates for the Sony FS5 and FS7. Sony also introduced the AXS-R7 external recorder for the F55.CraftCraft stole the show without even having a booth. The modular camera came out of nowhere. The company had been teasing a production camera leading up to NAB 2016, where they finally released all the specs on their website. The biggest note was that all the information came from the website specs, as a functional camera has not been revealed — only a 3D rendering.Lytro Lytro showed off a camera unlike any other, using Lytro’s light-field technology. This camera doesn’t shoot images as much as it gathers information. The Lytro Cinema captures every ray of light in a scene, giving each pixel color properties. This doesn’t only give you control of color grading, but in post you can focus and change the depth of field. This gives you infinite creative choices in editing. The camera will also work wonders in VR.CanonNo updates on the 5D MKIV or any other DSLRs. The company did announce the ME200S-SH, a Super 35 camera that has the same sensor used in the C100 series. PanasonicPanasonic touted two new midrange 4K UX camcorders — AG-UX180 and the AG-UX90 — plus the Varicam LT that was announced earlier this year. The Varicam LT is a 4K Super 35mm camera designed for indie filmmakers.KinefinityKinefinity unveiled the new 5K and 6K Terra cameras. Both cameras are rather impressive, proving that the Chinese manufacturer is making giant strides in trying to break into an international market.Leica Leica debuted the new Leica SL, a 4K mirrorless camera designed to take on the likes of the a7S and GH4.LensesIn one of the main topics we have not yet covered this year, there were quite a few new lenses announced at NAB 2016.SLR Magic GH4 Anamorphic LensesEarly last year, Panasonic announced a GH4 update that offered support for anamorphic lenses. The problem? The only anamorphic lenses built for the GH4 needed an adapter or DIY setup. SLR Magic has remedied the situation with a new lineup designed for the GH4. Check out more over at No Film School.Zeiss AnamorphicThe new Zeiss Master Anamorphics offer interchangeable rear and front elements, giving you a multitude of options. Their new Compact Zooms are designed for lighter cameras, and their T1.5 Compact Primes are also now available. No Film School has more on the new Zeiss glass.Zenit LensImage via PetaPixelZenit returns with the new Zenitar 50mm f/0.95, 50mm f/1.2, and 85mm f/1.2 lenses. These lenses are all expected to see a 2017 release at a fairly low price. Peta Pixel has more on these new Zenit lenses.ArriARRI and Zeiss introduced two new lenses — the MA28 and MA180. The MA28 is a 28mm lens with T1.9 aperture speed, ideal for low-light work and shallow depth of field. The MA180 is a 180mm lens with T2.8 and a front diameter of 95mm.SchneiderSchneider has a new full frame Xenon lens — the Xenon FF 18mm T2.4. The company claims this to be the fastest full frame prime lens on the market. See more on No Film School.Video EditingWipster vs Frame.ioBoth Wipster and Frame.io made major strides in their video editing platforms. Both companies had previously hosted videos on their sites, which allowed editors to send proofs to clients — who could then make notes and adjustments during playback. Now both companies have integrated with Premiere Pro. Wipster released the Review Panel and Frame.io announced a Premiere Pro plugin (they also have a FCPX plugin).Adobe Adobe announced several updates to the Creative Cloud, most notably the major Premiere Pro VR capabilities. They also boosted Lumetri color controls, giving you more abilites when color grading.FCPX Editor KitsPremiumBeat teamed up with Shutterstock to create a new series of FCPX tutorials. Unlike your typical tutorial, we are providing footage, music, and assets for FREE. This allows you to accurately follow along and truly hone your skills as an editor. The Editor Kits are also featured on the official Apple Final Cut Pro page. You can download the assets and watch the tutorials at PremiumBeat.com/FCPX.Monitors, Lighting, Audio Equipment, and GearThere is always so much new gear at every NAB show. If you’re looking for more in-depth coverage on a specific product, be sure to check out our NAB 2016 roundups;The Newest in Monitoring, Lighting, and AudioThe Latest Camera Rigs, Dollies, Gimbals, Drones, and MoreMore of the Latest Camera Rigs, Dollies, Gimbals, and DronesDJIDJI was quick to make headlines for their major announcements — a new cinematic drone and a new Ronin gimbal. The Matrice 600 hexacopter will take your production cameras to the sky. The drone was designed to mount the new Ronin-MX gimbal — which can easily carry anything from a DSLR up to a RED or ALEXA Mini.ARRIIn a surprise move, ARRI announced the purchase of the Artemis Trinity from Sachtler/Vitec. The stablization system combines a gimbal with a traditional Steadicam rig. ARRI also announce some new lenses they collaborated on with Zeiss, as well as some great updates for the SkyPanel series of lights.MonitorsSmallHD really impressed the audience with their new SmallHDR line — a monitor so rugged it survived being beaten by bats, bullets, and trucks.Atomos announced a new flagship monitor/recorder, the Shogun Inferno. Blackmagic revealed their new Video Assist 4K, which was designed for ease with its touchscreen display.Read more about all of these monitors in our roundup.LightingAs previously mentioned, ARRI had a fantastic update to the SkyPanel, giving owners instant access to a catalog of gel colors, allowing you to change your color temperature to just about any color imaginable.KinoFlo introduced the Select Series LED fixtures with a Kelvin range of 2700K to 6500K. Fotodiox introduced a new FlapJack LED Wand and LED Ring Light. Ikan released some new Lyra LED Soft Lights, and Aputure showed off the new Lightstorm COB 120t fresnel. You can read about all of these lights here. In addition to our roundup — Hive Lighting debuted the incredible WASP 1000 and BEE 1000, two lights with the output of a 2.5K HMI. Mole-Richardson showed off the Tener LED, a 10K Tungsten equivalent. Each of these lights can be powered by a regular outlet. AudioTascam revealed the DR-10SG, a recorder with built-in microphone that attaches directly to your camera, ideal for DSLR and mirrorless shooters. Zoom introduced the U-24 and U-44 interface, which allow you to connect microphones, instruments, or monitors into an array of recording devices like computers and iPads. Aputure announced the low budget A-Lyra Lavalier mic and D3 Shotgun mic. Sennheiser showed off a new supercardioid microphone also designed for DSLR and mirrorless users. The MKE 440 is a stereo pair set in a V shape, said to represent the viewpoint of the camera. Read more about these microphones in our roundup.Other Tech and StorageFor storing and managing footage, G Tech debuted the G-Rack 12, a RAID 6 storage solution than can store up to 120TB of data. Switcher Studio‘s app allows you to control live camera switching through your mobile device.For storing gear, the new Pelican Air line has kept the same durability of the Pelican name with a 40% weight reduction. Those with drones will be excited to hear about the CaseCruzer, a durable shell that not only protects your drone, but can also charge three batteries and the remote.As far as stabilizers and gimbals, there were just too many to list here. Brand new gear from Kessler, eye catching devices by Edelkrone, a new EVF from Zacuto, the Freefly Alta 8 cinema drone, and the amazing robotic arm — KIRA.Be sure to check out the corresponding NAB 2016 posts, The Latest Camera Rigs, Dollies, Gimbals, Drones, and More and the aptly named More of the Latest Camera Rigs, Dollies, Gimbals, and Drones.That does it for NAB 2016. What are you most excited about getting your hands on? Let us know in the comments below.last_img read more

Roundup: 5 Cutting-Edge Apps for the Modern Filmmaker

first_imgTechnology and filmmaking meet in these innovative apps that are changing the game for digital filmmakers and video producers.Cover image by GaudiLab.While they may only be separated by a few hundred miles of highway in California, Silicon Valley and Hollywood seem worlds apart in terms of their thinking and style. Silicon Valley, the hotbed of innovation and future-minded technologies stands in stark contrast to the classical Hollywood film industry based on analog film stock and traditional box office values.However, as filmmaking becomes more digital and more diverse, technology and film production are beginning to integrate with some exciting new apps, platforms, and services. Let’s look at some of the most innovative developments for the modern digital filmmaker.1. Illuminati Light MeterImage via PremiumBeat.First off, let’s look at one of the most impressive cutting-edge technologies to go digital — light meters. Particularly the Illuminati meter, which comes with a meter that connects to your smartphone via Bluetooth. From the companion app, you can read everything from color temperature to video light exposure to stills-style light exposure and chromaticity. While it is one of the pricier offerings on this list, it’s actually quite a bargain — and much handier than traditional analog light meters.Read more about the Illuminati Light Meter in this hands-on review.2. Script Transferring AppsIf there’s one aspect of filmmaking that’s archaically behind the times, it’s the scripts. Especially when you consider lengthy revision processes, the concept of printing out new versions of scripts for all of your cast and crew is a waste of time and paper. Luckily, apps like Scriptation are scrambling to fill the void for a fully transferable and adaptable scripts. The app, featured in the video above, has been used on shows like Stranger Things, The Walking Dead, and Silicon Valley.You can find out more about Scriptation at their website.3. Virtually Practice Your PitchImage by SFIO CRACHO.While most of these apps assist with the different periods of production (pre through post), there’s another element that you should consider. Pitching projects, whether to clients, investors, or film studios, is a huge part of the film and video world and is perhaps one of the most crucial skills to cultivate. Virtual Reality is now helping people practice public speaking and overcome anxiety, with a new app called PanicLobster. The app helps everyone from filmmakers to entrepreneurs practice their one-minute pitches or presentations.VR is not limited to just film and video either. Check out this article at Shutterstock about other ways VR is making the world a better place.4. Lighting Cue SoftwareFor your gaffers and lighting department, the Cuelist is a new program designed to update the process of marking and sharing the placement of tech cues throughout your production process. The software is specifically tailored for lighting designers, who spend lots of time and energy marking scripts and shot lists with notes about lighting cues, setups, and workflows.Watch the video above or check out the Cuelist’s website for more info.5. Multi-Track Video EditingImage via LumaTouch.Aimed at filmmakers, video professionals, and digital journalists on the go, the LumaFusion is one of the best multi-track editors for smartphones and tablet devices currently on the market. Based on the Pinnacle Studio App, LumaFusion has just about all the bells and whistles you’ll need when editing on the fly and cutting together your packages. You can even add graphics and effects for some nice-looking-but-quick exports.You can find out more on the LumaTouch website here.For more innovative tips and tricks for film and video production, check out some of these articles.Tech and Film: 7 Innovations Changing the IndustrySpeed Up Your Workflow with Adobe’s New Project Rush4 Awesome Innovations in Lens Technology Every Filmmaker NeedsYou Can Now Buy a Robotic Camera Arm That Plugs into an OutletThe 11 Best Filmmaking Apps for iPhonelast_img read more

Love the Game, Win or Lose

first_imgA “no” is just as much a part of the game as a “yes.” You like the part of the game when your dream client says “yes” to your “ask.” You must also love the game when your dream client tells you “no.” It’s all part of the game, and no one is undefeated.Prospecting is as big a part of the game is presenting in the board room. Your love for opportunity creation has to be every bit as deep as your love of what comes after an opportunity has been created. If you don’t love opportunity creation, if you don’t love the pursuit, you don’t love the game.Asking for time is as important as the final “ask,” when you ask your dream client for their business. The sexy part of sales is when you get ink on paper and move your opportunity into the win column. Everything before that is the real game being played, the meetings, the back and forth, the risks. You have to love everything between target and close.The deals that run off the tracks are part of the same game as the deals that end up in the win column. You are too happy about deals that die or are lost prematurely, and through no fault of your own. The deals that are lost on the way to your wins are part of the game, not separate from it.Being competitively displaced when you make a mistake or misstep is the same game you are playing when you competitively displace your competitor. Given a long enough timeline, you will lose the clients you win. Even if it takes decades. That’s the same game as the one when you take your competitor’s longtime loyal client from them.You aren’t supposed to like to lose. It’s not supposed to be fun. You’re also not supposed to like the word “no,” or dealing with deals that go south for no reason. You do, however, need to love the game enough to play it hard, and to learn to play it well. Win or lose. Get the Free eBook! Learn how to sell without a sales manager. Download my free eBook! You need to make sales. You need help now. We’ve got you covered. This eBook will help you Seize Your Sales Destiny, with or without a manager. Download Nowlast_img read more

Bengal BJP leaders go all out to rein in flock

first_imgIn an attempt to prevent further embarrassment for the party, BJP leaders on Thursday visited the homes of workers, who had hosted party national president Amit Shah during his ‘Booth Chalo Abhiyan’ in Kolkata last week. The development comes a day after Geeta and Raju Mahali, who had hosted lunch for Mr. Shah at Naxalbari in Darjeeling, joined the Trinamool Congress.BJP leader Locket Chatterjee visited Sandhya Mondal and others in Chetla and Bhawanipore area and shared sweets and buttermilk at their home. She also asked if there was any pressure on the family members. “We are concerned about their security. If TMC can carry out such a heinous act in north Bengal, then they can repeat it in Bhawanipore also,” she told journalists. ‘Police involved’Meanwhile, protests were organised by the BJP across the State on Thursday alleging that the Naxalbari couple had been “kidnapped and forced” to join the Trinamool. BJP national secretary Kaliash Vijayvargiya came to the city to participate in a protest rally. “When the couple went missing, our party activists went to lodge a police complaint. The police are involved and they also pressurised the couple to join the Trinamool,” Mr. Vijayvargiya said. Countering the allegations, Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee accused the BJP of “maligning” Bengal and “using obscene language” against her.In an obvious reference to Mr. Vijayvargiya, she said, “A few BJP leaders from outside, who neither have an idea of the State nor its culture, are trying to disrupt the harmony in Bengal.” (with inputs from PTI)last_img read more

Dera office-bearers face sedition, conspiracy cases

first_imgThe Haryana police have filed fresh cases of sedition and criminal conspiracy against senior office-bearers of the Dera Sacha Sauda for allegedly threatening a journalist and orchestrating the August 25 violence in Panchkula and Sirsa.Director-General of Police B.S. Sandhu ducked questions whether the Dera chief Gurmeet Ram Rahim Singh was named as an accused in the fresh cases.Mr. Sandhu said Honeypreet Singh, an adopted daughter of Singh, was present in the Panchkula courtroom when the verdict was announced, in her capacity as an attendant and as “physician” as Singh was unwell. He said Ms. Singh had taken the permission of the court. He dodged questions how Ms. Singh was present in the private helicopter arranged by the Haryana administration to ferry the Dera chief to the Rohtak jail. “After the verdict was announced, he was in the custody of prison officials,” Mr. Sandhu said. The chopper was arranged by the Haryana police.Viral videoA video showing the rape convict walk out of the courtroom flanked by Ms. Singh and senior officials of the Haryana government has gone viral. The video showed Ms. Singh giving directions to officials.In one photograph, Ms. Singh is seen sitting across the Dera chief in a chopper just before he was to be flown to Rohtak. In the photograph, the Dera chief is seen eating chocolate.last_img read more

Bihar Congress leader Ashok Choudhury says he was insulted

first_imgA day after he was removed from the post of Bihar Pradesh Committee (BPCC) president, Ashok Choudhury, on Wednesday broke down before media persons and said he wanted an “honourable exit and did not deserve to be insulted.”“Though I welcome the party decision but I don’t deserve the way I was insulted by being removed from the party post… I wanted an honourable exit… I’ll certainly go and meet our party top leadership to explain my position”, Mr Choudhury told media persons.“I was willing to resign and I never wanted to embarrass our party high command… I’m an honourable congressmen and deserve an honourable exit”, he said further. “I did not want to leave the party but now I don’t have any choice.”Earlier on Tuesday night the Congress party had removed Mr Choudhury from the post of Bihar party unit chief and appointed state party vice president Kaukab Quadri as the working president.Mr Choudhury (49), who was State education minister in the previous grand alliance government, was in thick of controversy for quite some time allegedly being charged for pushing a split in the state unit of the party ever since JD(U) had joined hands with BJP to form an NDA government in Bihar.Mr Choudhury’s tenure of four years as State party chief had also been completed. It was under his tenure the party had won 27 seats out of total 40 seats allocated under the grand alliance in 2015 Assembly elections.“Our party vice president Rahul Gandhi goes to a Dalit’s home and visits Dalit villages but here in Bihar, a Dalit party president and leader was humiliated and insulted by him on the advice of a some party general secretaries… I’ll meet Mr Gandhi and apprise him all about this”, he said while addressing media persons in Patna.Mr Choudhury targeted party general secretary and in-charge of Bihar affairs, C.P. Joshi for “misleading” Mr. Gandhi. However, earlier, he had not gone to Delhi on being summoned by Mr Gandhi for a meeting to discuss the crisis in Bihar after the collapse of the Grand Alliance.In August when RJD chief Lalu Prasad had called a BJP bhagao, Desh bachao rally in Patna, Mr Choudhury had requested party president Sonia Gandhi and VP Rahul Gandhi to skip the rally as sharing stage with tainted Mr Prasad would give signal of “compromising with corruption.”Mr Gandhi had sent party leaders C.P. Joshi and Ghulam Nabi Azad as representatives to attend the event.Meanwhile, the political buzz in the State is that Mr Choudhury in all likelihood would join hands with JD(U) by resigning from the party or make a split in the State unit. He, said party sources, has already drummed support of at least 14 party MLAs while, 18 are required for making a split out of total 27 MLAs.Most of the Congress MLAs supporting Mr Choudhury have been elected from urban Assembly constituencies and they are afraid of going to upcoming poll along with “tainted RJD.”last_img read more

Nine new Ministers take oath in Punjab

first_imgAs nine new Cabinet Ministers were inducted into the Punjab government on Saturday, Chief Minister Captain Amarinder Singh denied any “unfairness” in their selection. He said that adequate representation had been given to all sections and regions in choosing the Ministers, with seniority being the key criteria.Punjab Governor V.P. Singh Badnore administered the oath of office and secrecy to the new Ministers. The Ministers who took oath include Om Parkash Soni, Rana Gurmeet Singh Sodhi, Sukhjinder Singh Randhawa, Gurpreet Singh Kangar, Sukhbinder Singh Sarkaria, Balbir Singh Sidhu, Vijay Inder Singla, Sunder Sham Arora and Bharat Bhushan Ashu .Ministers of State Aruna Chaudhary and Razia Sultana were also elevated as Cabinet Ministers. With this, the Punjab Cabinet now has a total strength of 18.“The focus had been on striking a regional and caste balance, in order to ensure holistic development of the State,” said the Chief Minister, while responding to questions from journalists in an informal chat after the swearing-in ceremony at the Raj Bhavan here.To a question about certain MLAs having quit party posts after failing to find a berth in the Cabinet, the Chief Minister said all issues would be amicably resolved.last_img read more

CBI records Rabri’s statement in money laundering case

first_imgA team of Central Bureau of Investigation officials on Tuesday recorded the statement of former Bihar Chief Minister Rabri Devi in connection with an alleged money laundering case involving a cooperative bank run by a close aide of RJD chief Lalu Prasad. A huge amount of high-value currency notes were said to be deposited in that bank after demonetisation.“Two-three days ago Rabri Devi had received a notice from the CBI to record her statement in connection with money deposited in the Bihar Awami Cooperative Bank…the CBI team had come today, asked some questions to Rabri Devi and left after sometime,” Bhola Yadav, a close family aide of Lalu Prasad and party MLA told journalists outside Rabri Devi’s residence. He also added that “Rabri Devi produced papers of her Income Tax return and other necessary documents to the CBI officials”. The CBI officials did not questioned any other member of the family, he said. RJD chief Lalu Prasad, who is currently on provisional bail for six weeks from the Ranchi High Court, too was present at the residence. Mr. Prasad is to leave for Mumbai for his medical check-up soon.The Bihar Awami Cooperative Bank is run and headed by Anwar Ahmed, a close aide of Mr. Prasad. Mr. Ahmed started the Bihar Awami Cooperative Bank in which high-value currency notes were allegedly deposited in huge amount after demonetisation on November 8, 2016. The CBI has been investigating the case.‘Family harassed’Mr. Prasad and his family members are currently facing several alleged corruption charges by investigating agencies like the Income-Tax Department, the Enforcement Directorate and the CBI. Meanwhile, reacting over the CBI team reaching Rabri Devi’s residence in Patna, alliance party Hindustani Awam Morcha (Secular) leader Jitan Ram Manjhi told journalists that it was all being done by ruling NDA “to harass the family members of Lalu Prasad”.last_img read more

3 held for stealing goods worth ₹27 lakh

first_imgAPMC police nabbed one transporter, Mohammed Imran Ibrahim (28), and his friends, Mohammed Shamim Mohammed Azeez Shaikh (26) and Nizamuddin Naruddin Shaikh (28), for stealing electronic goods worth ₹27 lakh, within 12 hours. On Wednesday Nizamuddin Shah, a tempo driver, was transporting electronic goods from Chawla warehouse in APMC. After loading the tempo, he went somewhere on work. When he came back, he found the tempo missing and subsequently approached the police. The police sent a wireless message across police stations in Navi Mumbai and patrolling teams. “We received information that the tempo was seen in Taloja and after a brief search, we located it and the accused,” police sub inspector Shivaji Kare from APMC police station said.In the interrogation it was revealed that Mr. Ibrahim was a friend of the warehouse owner. He had a truck which was used for the loading of goods from the warehouse before. “A few years back, the accused had sold off his truck due to financial issues and wanted to buy another one, for which he planned the theft. During a visit to the warehouse, he had managed to make duplicate the keys of the tempo and used it to steal the tempo and the loaded goods with the help of his friends,” Mr. Kare said. The stolen items were worth ₹56.93 lakh was recovered including the stolen tempo. The accused have been arrested under section 379 (theft) of the IPC.last_img read more

Congress optimistic of alliance in U.P., says Raj Babbar

first_imgUttar Pradesh Congress chief Raj Babbar said on Sunday that his party was “optimistic” of a grand alliance in the State for the 2019 Lok Sabha polls. He said the people want the Opposition to contest the general elections in Uttar Pradesh together.“In the present scenario, irrespective of the party and the pressures they might be facing from their voters, we have to unitedly contest the Lok Sabha polls,” Mr. Babbar said.“In the Lok Sabha elections in U.P., I’m optimistic of a grand alliance…Lok Sabha elections are at the national level and there are only two forces. I’m not saying that there are only two parties, but there are only two ideologies. One is of Gandhiji on which the Congress runs and other is of the RSS which is in search of credibility,” he said.Mr. Babbar claimed that the RSS was searching for credibility since 1924 and that it had no identity.“They (BJP) have a majority government, but still Hindus and Muslims are being made to realise their differences. They said they got a big majority and have reduced everyone (all other parties) to zero. But can they destroy our ideology completely,” he asked.Referring to a three-day conclave held by the Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh at Vigyan Bhavan in Delhi, the Congress leader alleged the the Sangh misused the government and for the first time Vigyan Bhavan was used for a non-government programme.last_img read more

Encounter breaks out in J-K’s Pulwama

first_imgAn encounter broke out between security forces and militants in Pulwama district of Jammu and Kashmir on Tuesday, police said. Security forces launched a cordon and search operation in Chaanketaar village of Tral in south Kashmir district this afternoon following specific inputs about the presence of militants in the area, a police official said. He said as the forces were undertaking searches in the area, the militants fired upon them. The security forces retaliated, ensuing an encounter, the official said. The gunfight was going on, he said, adding that further details were awaited.last_img

Major fire breaks out in Pune’s Shivajinagar slum cluster

first_imgA major fire broke out at a slum cluster in the city’s Shivajinagar area Wednesday afternoon.While initial reports suggest there was no loss to life, authorities have yet to ascertain the number of injured in the mishap.According to reports, the blaze, which was apparently caused by a gas cylinder explosion, rapidly engulfed scores of slum-houses in the heavily crowded Patil Estate area. More than 50 families are said to be affected as around hundred shanties are estimated charred due to the blaze.The inferno was brought under control after nearly three hours of fierce firefighting. Nearly 30 fire tenders from a number of points in the city including Pimpri-Chinchwad and the Khadki Cantonment Board, as well as ambulances were pressed into action. “It appears that a cylinder explosion in lane number 3 in the Patil Estate slum cluster caused the fire. 8-10 cylinders exploded as the fire caught on. While the situation is under control, operations are far from complete,” said Prashant Ranpise, the Pune Municipal Corporation’s chief fire officer.As the blaze spread, terrified residents rushed out into the open, scrambling out with whatever belongings they could lay their hands on.The conflagration led to major traffic snarls at a number of points in the city including the crowded Maldhakka Chowk-Mangalwar Peth road area. Traffic coming from Pimpri-Chinchwad into Pune was diverted along a different route.Plumes of smoke were seen billowing from the tightly-packed slum as firefighters had a hard time dousing the flames. Elected representatives including Mayor Mukta Tilak as well as local MLAs visited the spot, reassuring that those persons who were displaced would be compensated.A fire had broken out earlier this week under similar circumstances in lane number 5 in the same slum cluster. Four-five shanties were charred at the time.In October this year, another fire caused by a cylinder explosion had claimed two lives in a slum area in Pimpri-Chinchwad.last_img read more

Ex-Cong. MLA joins BSP

first_imgFormer Congress legislator from Koraput, Krushna Chandra Sagaria, formally joined the Bahujan Samaj Party here on Sunday.Mr. Sagaria, a Dalit leader who had been recently expelled from the Congress, joined the BSP in the presence of party’s Odisha in-charge Dharamveer Singh. If the BSP allows him he will contest against Chief Minister Naveen Patnaik in the upcoming Assembly elections, Mr. Sagaria said. On November 6, 2018, Mr. Sagaria had resigned from the legislator’s post stating that he had no moral right to hold the position after the Kunduli gang-rape and suicide incident. He was expelled from the Congress on January 19, 2019. (With PTI inputs)last_img

6 IAF personnel, civilian killed in helicopter crash in Budgam

first_imgSix Indian Air Force (IAF) personnel, including the pilot and the co-pilot, and a civilian were killed in the Mi-17 V5 helicopter crash in Budgam on Wednesday morning. Meanwhile, two Jaish-e-Muhammad militants were killed in an encounter in Shopian. According to the IAF statement, the IAF helicopter got airborne from the Srinagar airfield at 10 a.m. for a routine mission and crashed around 10:10 a.m. at Budgam’s Garend Kalaan village. “All six air warriors onboard the helicopter suffered fatal injuries. A Court of Inquiry has been ordered to investigate the accident,” said the statement. The police said one civilian, Kifayat Ganaie, was also killed in the crash. Initial reports suggested it developed a technical snag in the air and swirled to the ground. The location in Budgam is not far way from the Srinagar airport. Locals told The Hindu they heard two loud explosions and a fire of ball emerging from an open field, with a residential colony nearby. Locals rushed to the spot and video-graphed the incident on the mobile phones.  2 Jaish militants killed in encounter Meanwhile, the police said two Jaish-e-Muhammad (JeM) militants were killed in an operation. “Based on a credible input about the presence of militants in Shopian’s Memender, an operation was launched. The search party was fired and two militants were killed in retaliatory fire,” said the police. The slain militants were identified as Suhail Nazir Mir from Shopian’s Saidapora-Payeen and another as foreigner from Pakistan. “They were involved in conspiring and executing several  militant attacks,” said the police.last_img read more

Higgs Theorists Win Physics Nobel in Overtime

first_imgThe most eagerly anticipated and potentially controversial Nobel Prize for physics in many years was awarded today—following a nail-biting hourlong delay—exactly according to the expected script: The winners are Peter Higgs and his fellow theorist François Englert for, essentially, predicting the Higgs boson. The winners were much heralded following last year’s discovery of the Higgs by physicists at the CERN particle physics lab near Geneva, Switzerland, using its Large Hadron Collider (LHC).That finding put in place the last piece of the puzzle to complete the standard model of fundamental particles and forces nearly 50 years after Higgs, Englert, and others predicted the existence of the elusive particle. “You may imagine this is not very unpleasant, of course,” Englert told reporters after the announcement. “I am very happy to have the recognition of this extraordinary award.” Higgs, of the University of Edinburgh in the United Kingdom, said in a statement released by the university that he was “overwhelmed to receive this award.”Few contest that Higgs and Englert are worthy winners, but, as often happens with Nobel Prizes, it is the “others” that make the prize controversial. It was Englert and his colleague Robert Brout, both at the Free University of Brussels, who first published a theory in August 1964 of how to give force-carrying particles mass without wrecking the symmetry that was key to the quantum field theories at the heart of the standard model. Higgs published his version 7 weeks later. But then in November a third group, made up of Tom Kibble of King’s College London; Gerald Guralnik, now at Brown University; and Carl Hagen, now at the University of Rochester in New York, published a third version, considered by many the most thorough and complete.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)So there are six people with a claim to the prize, although Brout died in 2011. Nobel Prize rules do not allow it to be awarded to more than three people, and it cannot be awarded posthumously. Following last year’s discovery of the Higgs, many physicists felt that it was time to reward these researchers for their achievement, especially as some of them are now in their 80s. But which ones?The scheduled time for the announcement, 11:45 a.m. Stockholm time today, came and went. Journalists and officials waited for more than an hour, without explanation, before members of the Nobel physics committee came out. The laureates are chosen on the day of the announcement, Olga Botner of Uppsala University in Sweden, a member of the committee, explained in an interview afterward. “There was a discussion, a very good discussion,” she said.Frank Close, a theorist at the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom, says there was huge tension building during the wait. “After 50 years, it was worth waiting another hour,” he says. Confirmation of the theory is “a seminal moment in culture,” Close says. “The fact that we are all immersed in some mysterious stuff [the Higgs field] is amazing, and that we can do the experiment to verify that is also astonishing.” But Close thinks this award should also be dedicated to “a triumph of engineering”: the LHC. The fact that it was built, that it works, and that it did what it was designed for in discovering the Higgs boson should be celebrated. “It is experiment that decides what reality is,” he says.Close acknowledges the disappointment for the third group of theorists who missed out on the prize. “They were scooped,” he says. But he thought that Kibble would be named as a third laureate because he went on to explain in another solo paper in 1967 how to keep photons massless in the new theory, work that paved the way for another Nobel Prize for the electroweak force in 1979. That paper “was as profound as the whole lot,” Close says, and Kibble “had been there throughout [the development of the theory].” Kibble says that, because of his group’s later publication, “it was very difficult to include us. But I’m glad they’ve recognized this topic as it is a very important one.”last_img read more

Updated: Over Scientists’ Objections, Japan Adopts State Secrets Law

first_imgJapanese scientists and academics are warning that legislation threatening prison terms for those who divulge and publish what the government deems a state secret threatens academic freedom and the public’s right to know.The bill has been rushed through Japan’s parliament so quickly that opponents have had little time to react. The lower house of the Diet passed the bill on 26 November, and the upper house approved the bill on 6 December.That fast track gave scientists little time to voice their opposition. A hastily formed ad hoc group of about 30 scholars—including Nobel laureates Toshihide Maskawa, a physicist now at Nagoya University, and Hideki Shirakawa, a chemist and professor emeritus at the University of Tsukuba—issued a statement [in Japanese here] on 28 November saying the secrecy law “threatens the pacifist principles and fundamental human rights established by the constitution and should be rejected immediately.” The statement further says, “Even in difficult times, protecting the freedom of the press, of thought and expression and of academic research is indispensable.”Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Maskawa and others held a press conference on 3 December to draw attention to the issue. Since then, more than 3000 academics have signed the group’s statement, says Chiba University historian Hiroaki Ozawa, one of the organizers. On 2 December, The Japan Scientists’ Association expressed similar concerns [Japanese pdf here] about the possible impact on scientific research.Virtually all of Japan’s mass media outlets, many nongovernmental organizations, legal organizations, and even some prefectural legislatures officially oppose the bill. Polls show that the general public doesn’t like it, either. But the ruling coalition of the Liberal Democratic and New Komeito parties, led by Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, has used its majority in both houses of the Diet to brush aside opposition. Using a parliamentary maneuver, a committee of the upper house cut off debate on the bill on 5 December. The upper house approved the bill the next day.Under the new law, government employees who leak secret information could face up to 10 years in prison; journalists who solicit such information could get 5-year sentences. Opponents object to the vagueness of what constitutes state secrets and the absence of any third-party oversight on what government officials can designate a secret. The administration maintains that the law is intended to bolster national security, protect diplomatic efforts, and fight terrorism and espionage. Scientists are worried about a loss of academic freedom.In an interview with the Asahi Shimbun newspaper on 27 November, Maskawa agreed that the country needs to be able to keep sensitive information secret. But he worries that the broadly written bill could be extended to prevent public and academic scrutiny of information related to controversial policy issues.As one example, many scientists are pointing to what they view as the government’s tardy and incomplete disclosure of data from nuclear accidents. The most recent incident is the Fukushima nuclear power plant disaster of 2011. Maskawa pointed to a 1999 accident that killed two workers at a nuclear fuel processing plant in Tokaimura. Academic researchers want better information so as to independently verify the threat to public safety. “Rather than make something secret, security is better achieved by letting everyone have a look at it,” Maskawa told the newspaper. The scientists’ association will be looking at ways to limit the law’s implementation and other measures “to protect freedom of the press and of academia,” says Mitsugu Yoneda, an economist at Chuo University who is head of the group’s secretariat. “These are constitutional rights.” Ozawa says that concerned academics hope to convince the next administration to repeal the law.*Update, 8 December: This story was updated to reflect the upper house’s action on the bill on 6 December.last_img read more

ScienceShot: Jelly Doughnut on Mars Mystery Solved!

first_imgNo one had ever seen anything like it in the quarter-century of exploration on the surface of Mars. It appeared in front of the Opportunity rover as if it had fallen from the sky, and its resemblance to a jelly-filled doughnut stoked the media’s interest all the more. But the show’s over, folks. NASA announced today that, once Opportunity turned to get a clear view of where it had roved from, it was obvious—as mission scientists had speculated—that a rover wheel had rolled over a rock (center), broken off a bit of it, and sent the chip downhill to where it was seen days later. The dark red “filling” could have formed geologically recently after erosion exposed the rock at the surface, scientists said, or it could have formed long ago deep within Mars. End of story. On to the next rock.See more ScienceShots.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)last_img read more

A new shot at reducing research red tape

first_imgNo matter how much scientists complain about it, federal oversight of academic research isn’t going away. But could it be done better?The chair of a new National Academies panel examining how the government keeps tabs on its $40-billion-a-year investment wants that oversight “to be sensible enough so that investigators have more time to do research.” That’s a reference to an often-cited 2005 survey in which faculty say that “administrative tasks”—such as complying with agency reporting requirements—take up 42% of the time they devote to federally supported research projects.Speaking yesterday during a break at the panel’s first meeting in Washington, D.C., Larry Faulkner, president emeritus of the University of Texas (UT), Austin, told ScienceInsider that “it would be a mistake to think that the only purpose of this study is to lighten the regulatory burden on universities. Regulation is required, it’s justified, and it’s needed. What we’re trying to do is guide both government and higher education to find more efficient ways to address those needs.”Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)The new study is the latest attempt by the academic research community to seek relief from what it sees as the steady accretion of unreasonable and costly government-wide regulations and policy directives from individual agencies. Faulkner says he witnessed that growth firsthand as UT president from 1998 to 2006.“The job of vice president for research was transformed before my eyes,” he recalls. “It used to be about fostering large, complex, multidisciplinary research projects and removing any stumbling blocks. By the time I left, the job was consumed by coping with regulatory requirements—human subjects, animal research, environmental and safety practices, conflicts of interest, and so on. The scale of it really took off.”The opening session was replete with stories about policies that university administrators and scientists described as misguided—or worse. One outside speaker, Arthur Bienenstock, a physics professor emeritus and special assistant to the president of Stanford University in Palo Alto, California, for federal research policy, cited a proposal to change how universities are reimbursed for the cost of supporting federally funded research that would have resulted in scientists spending less time in the lab. “It took us 3 years to kill that idea,” said Bienenstock, who led a 2014 study by the National Science Board on how to improve government oversight of academic research.Two panelists chimed in with their own cautionary tales. Microbiologist Arturo Casadevall of Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland, took a swipe at the federal rules for conducting animal research. He’s written a tongue-in-cheek essay proposing that anyone shopping for a mouse trap at Home Depot should be required to abide by the same 200-page regulatory protocol he must follow in caring for his research animals. “If government oversight is so useful, then it should apply to everyone,” he explained about his idea, which he says colleagues have urged him to shelve.Lee Ellis of the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston pointed out that “I have to get recertified every 10 years as a surgeon, but I have to take a compliance course annually” to meet federal requirements relating to human subjects, biosafety, and other topics. “Which is more important to society?” he asked rhetorically.But other speakers warned the panel about the hidden dangers that could result from requesting changes to any existing federal rule or policy. For example, the current rules on disclosure of potential conflicts of interest by National Institutes of Health (NIH) grantees were triggered by the high-profile case of scientist—psychiatrist Charles Nemeroff of Emory University in Atlanta, who failed to tell his university about a conflict, noted Tobin Smith of the Association of American Universities, in Washington, D.C., who did not mention Nemeroff by name. The new policies make the universities responsible for handling every potential conflict that is disclosed, he said—a significant workload given that NIH funds about half of all federal academic research. “But I’m afraid that what will come back to bite us is the conflict-of-interest that we don’t know about.”Another long-standing complaint is that the federal government doesn’t provide sufficient funding for universities to comply with the new rules. Such “unfunded mandates” may cost universities as much as $4000 per student each year, Bienenstock told the panel, money that is often recouped by raising tuition. But Smith had warned the panel earlier that highlighting the cost of regulations by linking them to tuition may be an unwise political strategy.“If you say that you could save this much on tuition,” Smith said, “then the next time the government eliminates a regulation, some state legislator may ask you, ‘So how much are you going to lower tuition?’ There is certainly a connection, but you need to be careful.”Panelist David Korn, a professor at Harvard Medical School in Boston, said the same caution should apply to lifting the current federal ceiling on recoverable administrative expenses, which universities say is grossly inadequate. “We need to be very careful about going to Congress with a suggestion to review indirect costs,” he said. Many scientists don’t understand how the mechanism works, he said, and most members of Congress see it as some sort of profit stream, or other such nonsense.” Another panelist pointed out the contradictory nature of asking for full cost recovery from the federal government “while we’re willing to accept much lower reimbursement rates” from foundations.The roots of the new study lie in a 2007 law reauthorizing federal programs for higher education. It ordered up a review of all regulations that apply to universities. The Department of Education was told to fund the study, but the money wasn’t appropriated until 2014. Last summer the House of Representatives passed a bill asking the White House science office to study ways to streamline federal regulations and reporting requirements, although the Senate never took action. A coalition of federal agencies and universities have been chipping away at the issue for several years, and a 2012 National Academies report on the health of research universities also recommended changes in federal oversight.The new panel has been asked to develop a “framework and supporting principles” for how the government monitors university research. “I don’t think any of us know exactly what that means,” Faulkner admits. But the goal, he says, is to create “the intellectual structure against which regulations, old and new, would be tested.”Bienenstock agreed that a better rationale for federal oversight would be very useful. But he feels that correcting the problem may require a more fundamental overhaul of the current system, in which the government agrees to finance campus research in exchange for having universities train the nation’s future scientists and engineers. He said that partnership, created after World War II, is no longer working properly, especially with respect to biomedical research—the “800-pound gorilla” in the room.“The public wants more biomedical research done at universities than is consistent with the functions of those universities and academic medical centers,” Bienenstock told the panel. “If the public wants more research, we need a new funding model.”Correction, 10:14am, 2/18/2015: An earlier version of the story reported incorrectly that Lee Ellis was speaking about compliance with federal rules relating to the disclosure of potential conflicts of interest.last_img read more

Apple’s challenge in India made tougher by second import tax hike in two months

first_imgImport tax hikes hit Apple particularly hard as it currently imports all models other than the iPhone SE. Rival manufacturers, in contrast, locally assemble almost all the phones they sell in the country.Apple has already increased its prices in the country in response to the previous tax increase, and may now be faced with the prospect of a second price rise at a time it is trying to grow its market share.Read it at 9t5Mac Related Itemslast_img